You want to measure coping but your protocol' too long: Consider the brief cope

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2663 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies of coping in applied settings often confront the need to minimize time demands on participants. The problem of participant response burden is exacerbated further by the fact that these studies typically are designed to test multiple hypotheses with the same sample, a strategy that entails the use of many time-consuming measures. Such research would benefit from a brief measure of coping assessing several responses known to be relevant to effective and ineffective coping. This article presents such a brief form of a previously published measure called the COPE inventory (Carver, Scheier, & Wcintraub, 1989), which has proven to be useful in health-related research. The Brief COPE omits two scales of the full COPE, reduces others to two items per scale, and adds one scale. Psychometric properties of the Brief COPE arc reported, derived from a sample of adults participating in a study of the process of recovery after Hurricane Andrew.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)92-100
Number of pages9
JournalInternational Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1997

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Keywords

  • assessment
  • avoidance
  • coping
  • stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

You want to measure coping but your protocol' too long : Consider the brief cope. / Carver, Charles S.

In: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 4, No. 1, 01.03.1997, p. 92-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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