Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?

Giuseppe Orlando, Shay Soker, Robert J. Stratta, Anthony Atala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent groundbreaking advances in organ bioengineering and regeneration have provided evidence that regenerative medicine holds promise to dramatically improve the approach to organ transplantation. The two fields, however, share a common heritage. Alexis Carrel can be considered the father of both regenerative medicine and organ transplantation, and it is now clear that his legacy is equally applicable for the present and future generations of transplant and regenerative medicine investigators. In this review, we will briefly illustrate the interplay that should be established between these two complementary disciplines of health sciences. Although regenerative medicine has shown to the transplant field its potential, transplantation is destined to align with regenerative medicine and foster further progress probably more than either discipline alone. Organ bioengineering and regeneration technologies hold the promise to meet at the same time the two most urgent needs in organ transplantation, namely, the identification of a new, potentially inexhaustible source of organs and immunosuppression-free transplantation of tissues and organs.

Original languageEnglish
JournalCold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine
Volume3
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Regenerative Medicine
Transplantation (surgical)
Organ Transplantation
Transplantation
Bioengineering
Transplants
Regeneration
Tissue Transplantation
Social Responsibility
Fathers
Immunosuppression
Research Personnel
Health
Tissue
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation? / Orlando, Giuseppe; Soker, Shay; Stratta, Robert J.; Atala, Anthony.

In: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine, Vol. 3, No. 8, 01.08.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Orlando, Giuseppe ; Soker, Shay ; Stratta, Robert J. ; Atala, Anthony. / Will regenerative medicine replace transplantation?. In: Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in medicine. 2013 ; Vol. 3, No. 8.
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