Who should care for our kids? the effects of infant child care on early child development

Duan Peng, Philip K. Robins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between various types of child care during the first year of a child's life and the child's language and social development measured at age three. A unique contribution of the paper is the estimation of a general selection-correction model that accounts for non-random selection of children into different types of child care. The analysis uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS), a birth cohort of children born to predominantly low-income single mothers. The results indicate that compared with maternal care, relative care during infancy has more beneficial effects on a child's language development, while day care centers have more beneficial effects on a child's behavioral development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-45
Number of pages45
JournalJournal of Children and Poverty
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

Keywords

  • Behavioral development
  • Child care
  • Cognitive development
  • Fragile families and child wellbeing study (ffcw)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

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