Who should care for our kids? the effects of infant child care on early child development

Duan Peng, Philip Robins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper examines the relationship between various types of child care during the first year of a child's life and the child's language and social development measured at age three. A unique contribution of the paper is the estimation of a general selection-correction model that accounts for non-random selection of children into different types of child care. The analysis uses data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (FFCWS), a birth cohort of children born to predominantly low-income single mothers. The results indicate that compared with maternal care, relative care during infancy has more beneficial effects on a child's language development, while day care centers have more beneficial effects on a child's behavioral development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-45
Number of pages45
JournalJournal of Children and Poverty
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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child development
child care
infant
maternal care
day care
social development
language
effect
low income
income

Keywords

  • Behavioral development
  • Child care
  • Cognitive development
  • Fragile families and child wellbeing study (ffcw)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Urban Studies

Cite this

Who should care for our kids? the effects of infant child care on early child development. / Peng, Duan; Robins, Philip.

In: Journal of Children and Poverty, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.03.2010, p. 1-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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