Who Aren’t We Reaching? Young Sexual Minority Men’s Non-participation in an HIV-Prevention and Mental Health Clinical Trial

Audrey Harkness, Brooke G. Rogers, Raymond Balise, Daniel Mayo, Elliott R. Weinstein, Steven A. Safren, John E. Pachankis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite many successful clinical trials to test HIV-prevention interventions for sexual minority men (SMM), not all SMM are reached by these trials. Identifying factors associated with non-participation in these trials could help to ensure the benefits of research extend to all SMM. Prospective participants in New York City and Miami were screened to determine eligibility for a baseline assessment for a mental health/HIV-prevention trial (N = 633 eligible on screen). Logistic regression and classification and regression tree (CART) analysis identified predictors of non-participation in the baseline, among those who were screened as eligible and invited to participate. Individuals who reported unknown HIV status were more likely to be non-participators than those who reported being HIV-negative (OR = 2.39; 95% CI 1.41, 4.04). In New York City, Latinx SMM were more likely to be non-participators than non-Latinx white SMM (OR = 1.81; 95% CI, 1.09, 2.98). A CART model pruned two predictors of non-participation: knowledge of HIV status and age, such that SMM with unknown HIV status and SMM ages 18–19 were less likely to participate. Young SMM who did not know their HIV status, and thus are more likely to acquire and transmit HIV, were less likely to participate. Additionally, younger SMM (18–19 years) and Latinx SMM in New York City were less likely to participate. The findings suggest the importance of tailored recruitment to ensure HIV-prevention/mental health trials reach all SMM.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAIDS and Behavior
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • HIV prevention
  • Mental health
  • Recruitment and outreach
  • Sexual minority men

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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