White matter changes in schizophrenia evidence for myelin-related dysfunction

Kenneth L. Davis, Daniel G. Stewart, Joseph I. Friedman, Monte Buchsbaum, Philip D Harvey, Patrick R. Hof, Joseph Buxbaum, Vahram Haroutunian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

630 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerous lines of inquiry implicate connectivity as a central abnormality in schizophrenia. Myelination and factors that affect myelination, such as the function of oligodendroglia, are critical processes that could profoundly affect neuronal connectivity, especially given the diffuse distribution of oligodendrocytes and the widespread distribution of brain regions that have been implicated in schizophrenia. Multiple lines of evidence now converge to implicate oligodendroglia and myelin in schizophrenia. Imaging and neurocytochemical evidence, similarities with demyelinating diseases, age-related changes in white matter, myelin-related gene abnormalities, and morphologic abnormalities in the oligodendroglia demonstrated in schizophrenic brains are all examined in light of the hypothesis that oligodendroglial dysfunction and even death, with subsequent abnormalities in myelin maintenance and repair, contribute to the schizophrenic syndrome.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)443-456
Number of pages14
JournalArchives of General Psychiatry
Volume60
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Oligodendroglia
Myelin Sheath
Schizophrenia
Brain
Demyelinating Diseases
Maintenance
White Matter
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Davis, K. L., Stewart, D. G., Friedman, J. I., Buchsbaum, M., Harvey, P. D., Hof, P. R., ... Haroutunian, V. (2003). White matter changes in schizophrenia evidence for myelin-related dysfunction. Archives of General Psychiatry, 60(5), 443-456. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.60.5.443

White matter changes in schizophrenia evidence for myelin-related dysfunction. / Davis, Kenneth L.; Stewart, Daniel G.; Friedman, Joseph I.; Buchsbaum, Monte; Harvey, Philip D; Hof, Patrick R.; Buxbaum, Joseph; Haroutunian, Vahram.

In: Archives of General Psychiatry, Vol. 60, No. 5, 01.05.2003, p. 443-456.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, KL, Stewart, DG, Friedman, JI, Buchsbaum, M, Harvey, PD, Hof, PR, Buxbaum, J & Haroutunian, V 2003, 'White matter changes in schizophrenia evidence for myelin-related dysfunction', Archives of General Psychiatry, vol. 60, no. 5, pp. 443-456. https://doi.org/10.1001/archpsyc.60.5.443
Davis, Kenneth L. ; Stewart, Daniel G. ; Friedman, Joseph I. ; Buchsbaum, Monte ; Harvey, Philip D ; Hof, Patrick R. ; Buxbaum, Joseph ; Haroutunian, Vahram. / White matter changes in schizophrenia evidence for myelin-related dysfunction. In: Archives of General Psychiatry. 2003 ; Vol. 60, No. 5. pp. 443-456.
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