When the bough breaks the cradle will fall

Promoting the health and well being of infants and toddlers in juvenile court

Cindy S. Lederman, Joy D. Osofsky, Lynne Katz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately one-third of the children in the child welfare system are under the age of six. These children ore almost invisible in our juvenile courts. It is now clear from the emerging science of early childhood development that during the first few years of life children develop the foundation and capabilities on which all subsequent development builds. Living in emotional and environmental impoverishment and deprivation provides a poor foundation for healthy development. These very young and vulnerable children are exhibiting disproportionate developmental and cognitive delays, medical problems, and emotional disorders. However, there is growing evidence that early planned interventions can help. The juvenile court must take a leadership role in focusing on the very young child and learning more about risk, prevention, and early intervention in order to facilitate the healing process.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)33-38
Number of pages6
JournalJuvenile and Family Court Journal
Volume52
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

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juvenile court
infant
well-being
health
child welfare
deprivation
childhood
leadership
science
learning
evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law

Cite this

When the bough breaks the cradle will fall : Promoting the health and well being of infants and toddlers in juvenile court. / Lederman, Cindy S.; Osofsky, Joy D.; Katz, Lynne.

In: Juvenile and Family Court Journal, Vol. 52, No. 4, 01.12.2001, p. 33-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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