When groin pain signals an adductor strain

C. T. Hasselman, Thomas Best, W. E. Garrett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One of the most common causes of groin pain in athletes is a muscle strain injury, typically involving one of the adductor muscles. The history and physical exam should focus on common causes of groin pain in the athlete. Imaging studies should routinely include radiographs to rule out fractures, with CT and MRI reserved for more complicated cases in which the diagnosis is unclear from the history and physical exam. Management should be directed at the relief of pain and swelling, with early restoration of range of motion. Surgical repair may be indicated in acute, complete muscle rapture, or in complete, chronic muscle rapture with pain refractory to conservative treatment. Well-controlled clinical and laboratory studies are needed to determine optimal preventive measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPhysician and Sportsmedicine
Volume23
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Groin
Pain
Muscles
Athletes
History
Intractable Pain
Articular Range of Motion
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

When groin pain signals an adductor strain. / Hasselman, C. T.; Best, Thomas; Garrett, W. E.

In: Physician and Sportsmedicine, Vol. 23, No. 7, 01.01.1995.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Hasselman, C. T. ; Best, Thomas ; Garrett, W. E. / When groin pain signals an adductor strain. In: Physician and Sportsmedicine. 1995 ; Vol. 23, No. 7.
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