When families talk: Applying interpretative phenomenological analysis to African American families discussing their awareness, commitment, and knowledge of organ donation

Shawn D. Long, Susan E. Morgan, Tyler Harrison, Walid A. Afifi, Michael Stephenson, Tom Reichert, Chris Morse

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper applies interpretative phenomenological analysis as a tool to understand ways African American families discuss and make sense of their knowledge, awareness, and commitment of the organ donation process. African American families (n = 20) participated in self-directed conversations based on the organ donor model, which is grounded in the theory of reasoned action and the theory of motivated information management. Results indicate that the media strongly influences an individual's willingness to participate in the organ donation process and their commitment to further discuss their decisions with close family members. Greater attention should be given to cultural-specific campaigns to increase the number of African American donors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)555-563
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Medical Association
Volume104
Issue number11-12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Communication
  • Organ donation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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