What's in a smile?

Daniel S Messinger, A. Fogel, K. L. Dickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

58 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In positive social contexts, both adults and older infants show more Duchenne smiling (which involves high cheek raising) than non-Duchenne smiling (which does not). This study compared Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiles in early infancy for clues to their emotional significance. Infants (N = 13) from 1 to 6 months of age were videotaped weekly for 5 min in 208 face-to-face interactions with their mothers. Levels of Duchenne and non-Duchenne smiling were correlated within interactive sessions, and the 2 smiles had similar developmental trajectories. Duchenne smiles were typically preceded by non-Duchenne smiles. The results suggest these frequently contrasted types of smiles occur in similar situations and are often different temporal phases of a continuous emotional process. In contrast to adults, infant Duchenne smiles had longer durations than non-Duchenne smiles, suggesting infant smiling does not fit adult models of emotional functioning.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)701-708
Number of pages8
JournalDevelopmental Psychology
Volume35
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Cite this

Messinger, D. S., Fogel, A., & Dickson, K. L. (1999). What's in a smile? Developmental Psychology, 35(3), 701-708.

What's in a smile? / Messinger, Daniel S; Fogel, A.; Dickson, K. L.

In: Developmental Psychology, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.01.1999, p. 701-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Messinger, DS, Fogel, A & Dickson, KL 1999, 'What's in a smile?', Developmental Psychology, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 701-708.
Messinger DS, Fogel A, Dickson KL. What's in a smile? Developmental Psychology. 1999 Jan 1;35(3):701-708.
Messinger, Daniel S ; Fogel, A. ; Dickson, K. L. / What's in a smile?. In: Developmental Psychology. 1999 ; Vol. 35, No. 3. pp. 701-708.
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