What's a dog story worth?

Matthew D. Atkinson, Maria Deam, Joseph E. Uscinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Journalists consider the importance of events and the audience's interest in them when deciding on which events to report. Events most likely to be reported are those that are both important and can capture the audience's interest. In turn, the public is most likely to become aware of important news when some aspect of the story piques their interest. We suggest an efficacious means of drawing public attention to important news stories: dogs. Examining the national news agenda of 10 regional newspapers relative to that of the New York Times, we evaluated the eff ect of having a dog in a news event on the likelihood that the event is reported in regional newspapers. The "dog effect" is approximately equivalent to the eff ect of whether a story warrants front- or back-page national news coverage in the New York Times. Thus, we conclude that dogs are an important factor in news decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)819-823
Number of pages5
JournalPS - Political Science and Politics
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 6 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

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