What should psychiatry residents be taught about neurology? A survey of psychiatry residency directors

Linda M. Selwa, Deborah J. Hales, Andres M Kanner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To improve our ability to teach psychiatry residents during their required 2 months on neurology rotations, we investigated the perceived needs of psychiatry program training directors. METHODS: We contacted the program directors organization of the American Psychiatric Association and disseminated a web-based survey to all program directors. The survey asked questions about the format and content of neurology training desired for psychiatry residents. The survey was sent a second time to increase response rate. RESULTS: Sixty (32%) training directors responded. Overall satisfaction with neurologic education was rated at 3.6 out of 5 (standard deviation ± 0.96). The specific content areas which elicited the most interest for focused training modules were differential diagnosis and biologic substrates of dementia, evaluation and treatment of drug-related and spontaneous movement disorders, evaluation and management of sleep disorders, cognitive and mood effects of stroke, and inherited disorders. Many program directors commented on perceived weaknesses of inpatient-based exposure to neurology; 78% of responders favored outpatient and consultation settings. CONCLUSIONS: In an era of deliberation about neurobehavioral integration and cross-training of neurologists and psychiatrists, neurologists should strive to provide the best possible multidisciplinary education to psychiatry trainees.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)268-270
Number of pages3
JournalNeurologist
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Neurology
Internship and Residency
Psychiatry
Education
Drug Evaluation
Aptitude
Movement Disorders
Nervous System
Dementia
Inpatients
Differential Diagnosis
Outpatients
Referral and Consultation
Stroke
Surveys and Questionnaires
Neurologists
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Medical education
  • Neurology education
  • Program directors
  • Psychiatry education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

What should psychiatry residents be taught about neurology? A survey of psychiatry residency directors. / Selwa, Linda M.; Hales, Deborah J.; Kanner, Andres M.

In: Neurologist, Vol. 12, No. 5, 09.2006, p. 268-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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