What Patient Attributes Are Associated With Thoughts of Suing a Physician?

David A Fishbain, Daniel Bruns, J. Mark Disorbio, John E Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Fishbain DA, Bruns D, Disorbio JM, Lewis JE. What patient attributes are associated with thoughts of suing a physician? Objective: To address a neglected research area: the attributes of rehabilitation patients associated with "thoughts of suing a physician" (S-MD). Design: The S-MD statement "I am thinking about suing one of my doctors" was administered to 2264 people, along with the Battery for Health Improvement (BHI 2). Items predictive of S-MD were identified. Setting: Acute physical therapy, work hardening programs, chronic pain programs, physician offices, and vocational rehabilitation programs. Participants: Participants included 777 rehabilitation patients and 1487 nonpatient community-dwellers. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measures: We used a multivariate analysis of variance to determine which of the 18 BHI 2 scales predicted the S-MD statement. Items from the scales found to be predictive, plus other variables, were then used in a chi-square analysis that compared people who wished to sue with those who did not. We then used a stepwise regression analysis with significant items from the prior analyses to build a model for predicting a potential S-MD patient. Results: The highest percentage (11.5%) of patients affirming the S-MD statement were those involved in workers' compensation and personal injury litigation, compared with only 1.9% of community-living subjects. Stepwise regression of BHI 2 variables produced a 13-variable model explaining 38.04% of the variance. A logistic regression of demographic variables (eg, education, ethnicity, litigiousness) explained 20% of the variance. Conclusions: Anger (P<.001), mistrust (P<.001), a focus on compensation (P<.001), addiction (P<.001), severe childhood punishments (P<.001), having attended college (P<.001), and other patient variables were associated with thoughts of suing a physician.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)589-596
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume88
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Fingerprint

Physicians
Rehabilitation
Vocational Rehabilitation
Workers' Compensation
Physicians' Offices
Punishment
Anger
Jurisprudence
Compensation and Redress
Chronic Pain
Analysis of Variance
Multivariate Analysis
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Education
Health
Wounds and Injuries
Research

Keywords

  • Malpractice
  • Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

What Patient Attributes Are Associated With Thoughts of Suing a Physician? / Fishbain, David A; Bruns, Daniel; Disorbio, J. Mark; Lewis, John E.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 88, No. 5, 01.05.2007, p. 589-596.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fishbain, David A ; Bruns, Daniel ; Disorbio, J. Mark ; Lewis, John E. / What Patient Attributes Are Associated With Thoughts of Suing a Physician?. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2007 ; Vol. 88, No. 5. pp. 589-596.
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