What future for human rights?

James Nickel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Like people born shortly after World War II, the international human rights movement recently had its sixty-fifth birthday. This could mean that retirement is at hand and that death will come in a few decades. After all, the formulations of human rights that activists, lawyers, and politicians use today mostly derive from the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and the world in 1948 was very different from our world today: the cold war was about to break out, communism was a strong and optimistic political force in an expansionist phase, and Western Europe was still recovering from the war. The struggle against entrenched racism and sexism had only just begun, decolonization was in its early stages, and Asia was still poor (Japan was under military reconstruction, and Mao's heavy-handed revolution in China was still in the future). Labor unions were strong in the industrialized world, and the movement of women into work outside the home and farm was in its early stages. Farming was less technological and usually on a smaller scale, the environmental movement had not yet flowered, and human-caused climate change was present but unrecognized. Personal computers and social networking were decades away, and Earth's human population was well under three billion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)213-223
Number of pages11
JournalEthics and International Affairs
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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human rights
decolonization
sexism
communism
PC
Western Europe
retirement
lawyer
World War II
cold war
racism
networking
politician
UNO
farm
reconstruction
climate change
Japan
Military
labor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Political Science and International Relations
  • Philosophy

Cite this

What future for human rights? / Nickel, James.

In: Ethics and International Affairs, Vol. 28, No. 2, 2014, p. 213-223.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nickel, James. / What future for human rights?. In: Ethics and International Affairs. 2014 ; Vol. 28, No. 2. pp. 213-223.
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