What factors other than age predict performance on an information search task?

Sara J Czaja, Joseph Sharit, Sankaran N. Nair

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The number of workers aged 55+ will increase significantly in the next few decades. This paper examines factors such as cognitive abilities and prior computer experience that influence performance and job satisfaction on a simulated email-based customer service task among a sample of older adults. Fifty-two persons ranging in age from 50-80 performed the task for four days post-training. The participants also completed a cognitive battery, computer experience questionnaire, and measures of workload, intrinsic job satisfaction and intrinsic job motivation. The data indicated performance was influenced by prior computer experience, cognitive abilities and age such that those with less experience, lower abilities and who were older performed the task at lower levels. Job satisfaction was influenced by perceptions of workload, interest in computers and intrinsic job motivation. Generally people who rated workload higher and who had higher intrinsic motivation and greater interest in computers were more satisfied performing the task.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Pages195-199
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2006Oct 20 2006

Other

Other50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period10/16/0610/20/06

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Job satisfaction
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Czaja, S. J., Sharit, J., & Nair, S. N. (2006). What factors other than age predict performance on an information search task? In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (pp. 195-199)

What factors other than age predict performance on an information search task? / Czaja, Sara J; Sharit, Joseph; Nair, Sankaran N.

Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2006. p. 195-199.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Czaja, SJ, Sharit, J & Nair, SN 2006, What factors other than age predict performance on an information search task? in Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. pp. 195-199, 50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006, San Francisco, CA, United States, 10/16/06.
Czaja SJ, Sharit J, Nair SN. What factors other than age predict performance on an information search task? In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2006. p. 195-199
Czaja, Sara J ; Sharit, Joseph ; Nair, Sankaran N. / What factors other than age predict performance on an information search task?. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. 2006. pp. 195-199
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