What Dose of External-Beam Radiation is High Enough for Prostate Cancer?

Thomas N. Eade, Alexandra L. Hanlon, Eric M. Horwitz, Mark K. Buyyounouski, Gerald E. Hanks, Alan Pollack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

133 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To quantify the radiotherapy dose-response of prostate cancer, adjusted for prognostic factors in a mature cohort of men treated relatively uniformly at a single institution. Patients and Methods: The study cohort consisted of 1,530 men treated with three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy between 1989 and 2002. Patients were divided into four isocenter dose groups: <70 Gy (n = 43), 70-74.9 Gy (n = 552), 75-79.9 Gy (n = 568), and ≥80 Gy (n = 367). The primary endpoints were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) and Phoenix (nadir + 2.0 ng/mL) criteria, and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Multivariate analyses were performed and adjusted Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated. Logit regression dose-response functions were determined at 5 and 8 years for FFBF and at 5 and 10 years for FFDM. Results: Radiotherapy dose was significant in multivariate analyses for FFBF (ASTRO and Phoenix) and FFDM. Adjusted 5-year estimates of ASTRO FFBF for the four dose groups were 60%, 68%, 76%, and 84%. Adjusted 5-year Phoenix FFBFs for the four dose groups were 70%, 81%, 83%, and 89%. Adjusted 5-year and 10-year estimates of FFDM for the four dose groups were 96% and 93%, 97% and 93%, 99% and 95%, and 98% and 96%. Dose-response functions showed an increasing benefit for doses ≥80 Gy. Conclusions: Doses of ≥80 Gy are recommended for most men with prostate cancer. The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure does not accurately estimate the effects of radiotherapy at 5 years because of backdating, compared to the Phoenix definition, which is less sensitive to follow-up and more reproducible over time.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)682-689
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics
Volume68
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Prostatic Neoplasms
cancer
Radiation
dosage
Phoenix (AZ)
Radiation Oncology
metastasis
Radiotherapy
radiology
Neoplasm Metastasis
radiation therapy
estimates
Multivariate Analysis
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Cohort Studies
regression analysis

Keywords

  • Dose
  • Prostate cancer
  • Radiotherapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiation

Cite this

What Dose of External-Beam Radiation is High Enough for Prostate Cancer? / Eade, Thomas N.; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Pollack, Alan.

In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics, Vol. 68, No. 3, 01.07.2007, p. 682-689.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eade, Thomas N. ; Hanlon, Alexandra L. ; Horwitz, Eric M. ; Buyyounouski, Mark K. ; Hanks, Gerald E. ; Pollack, Alan. / What Dose of External-Beam Radiation is High Enough for Prostate Cancer?. In: International Journal of Radiation Oncology Biology Physics. 2007 ; Vol. 68, No. 3. pp. 682-689.
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abstract = "Purpose: To quantify the radiotherapy dose-response of prostate cancer, adjusted for prognostic factors in a mature cohort of men treated relatively uniformly at a single institution. Patients and Methods: The study cohort consisted of 1,530 men treated with three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy between 1989 and 2002. Patients were divided into four isocenter dose groups: <70 Gy (n = 43), 70-74.9 Gy (n = 552), 75-79.9 Gy (n = 568), and ≥80 Gy (n = 367). The primary endpoints were freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), defined by American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) and Phoenix (nadir + 2.0 ng/mL) criteria, and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Multivariate analyses were performed and adjusted Kaplan-Meier estimates were calculated. Logit regression dose-response functions were determined at 5 and 8 years for FFBF and at 5 and 10 years for FFDM. Results: Radiotherapy dose was significant in multivariate analyses for FFBF (ASTRO and Phoenix) and FFDM. Adjusted 5-year estimates of ASTRO FFBF for the four dose groups were 60{\%}, 68{\%}, 76{\%}, and 84{\%}. Adjusted 5-year Phoenix FFBFs for the four dose groups were 70{\%}, 81{\%}, 83{\%}, and 89{\%}. Adjusted 5-year and 10-year estimates of FFDM for the four dose groups were 96{\%} and 93{\%}, 97{\%} and 93{\%}, 99{\%} and 95{\%}, and 98{\%} and 96{\%}. Dose-response functions showed an increasing benefit for doses ≥80 Gy. Conclusions: Doses of ≥80 Gy are recommended for most men with prostate cancer. The ASTRO definition of biochemical failure does not accurately estimate the effects of radiotherapy at 5 years because of backdating, compared to the Phoenix definition, which is less sensitive to follow-up and more reproducible over time.",
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AU - Horwitz, Eric M.

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AU - Hanks, Gerald E.

AU - Pollack, Alan

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