What Accounts for Differences in Substance Use Among U.S.-Born and Immigrant Hispanic Adolescents? Results from a Longitudinal Prospective Cohort Study

Guillermo J Prado, Shi Huang, Seth J Schwartz, Mildred M. Maldonado-Molina, Frank C. Bandiera, Mario de la Rosa, Hilda Pantin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

75 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The current study was conducted to ascertain whether the effects of nativity (i.e., U.S. born vs. immigrant) on Hispanic adolescent substance use is mediated by ecological processes such as family functioning, school connectedness, and perceived peer substance use. Methods: The effects of family, peer, and school processes on adolescent substance use were examined in a nationally representative sample of 742 (358 male, 384 female) Hispanic youth (mean age = 15.9; SD = 1.8). Results: Results from a structural equation model indicated that the higher rates of substance use among U.S.-born Hispanics (compared with foreign-born Hispanics) are partially mediated by perceived peer substance use (as measured by the adolescent). The results also showed that perceived peer substance use and school connectedness mediate the relationship between family processes and substance use, suggesting that family processes may offset some of the deleterious effects of negative peer selection on adolescent substance use. Conclusion: These findings imply that public health behavioral interventions to prevent substance use among both U.S.-born and foreign-born Hispanics may need to attend to multiple ecological processes, including family, school, and peers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-125
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume45
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009

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Hispanic Americans
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Structural Models
Public Health

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • Hispanic
  • Immigrant
  • Nativity
  • Substance use

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

What Accounts for Differences in Substance Use Among U.S.-Born and Immigrant Hispanic Adolescents? Results from a Longitudinal Prospective Cohort Study. / Prado, Guillermo J; Huang, Shi; Schwartz, Seth J; Maldonado-Molina, Mildred M.; Bandiera, Frank C.; de la Rosa, Mario; Pantin, Hilda.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 45, No. 2, 01.08.2009, p. 118-125.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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