Water mass mixing

The dominant control on the zinc distribution in the North Atlantic Ocean

Saeed Roshan, Jingfeng Wu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dissolved zinc (dZn) concentration was determined in the North Atlantic during the U.S. GEOTRACES 2010 and 2011 cruise (GOETRACES GA03). A relatively poor linear correlation (R<sup>2</sup>0.756) was observed between dZn and silicic acid (Si), the slope of which was 0.0577nM/μmol/kg. We attribute the relatively poor dZn-Si correlation to the following processes: (a) differential regeneration of zinc relative to silicic acid, (b) mixing of multiple water masses that have different Zn/Si, and (c) zinc sources such as sedimentary or hydrothermal. To quantitatively distinguish these possibilities, we use the results of Optimum Multi-Parameter Water Mass Analysis by Jenkins et al. (2015) to model the zinc distribution below 500m. We hypothesized two scenarios: conservative mixing and regenerative mixing. The first scenario (conservative) could be modeled to results in a correlation with observations with a R<sup>2</sup>0.846. In the second scenario, we took a Si-related regeneration into account, which could model the observations with a R<sup>2</sup>0.867. Through this regenerative mixing scenario, we estimated a Zn/Si0.0548nM/μmol/kg that may be more realistic than linear regression slope due to accounting for process b. However, this did not improve the model substantially (R<sup>2</sup>0.867 versus0.846), which may indicate the insignificant effect of remineralization on the zinc distribution in this region. The relative weakness in the model-observation correlation (R<sup>2</sup>~0.85 for both scenarios) implies that processes (a) and (c) may be plausible. Furthermore, dZn in the upper 500m exhibited a very poor correlation with apparent oxygen utilization, suggesting a minimal role for the organic matter-associated remineralization process. Key Points Dissolved zinc shows a relatively weak correlation with silicic acid in the North Atlantic Dissolved zinc in the North Atlantic is mainly controlled by water mass mixing Some water mass end-members exhibit deviations in the Zn-Si correlation

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1060-1074
Number of pages15
JournalGlobal Biogeochemical Cycles
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2015

Fingerprint

Silicic Acid
water mass
silicic acid
Zinc
zinc
Water
remineralization
regeneration
distribution
North Atlantic Ocean
Linear regression
Biological materials
Oxygen
organic matter
oxygen

Keywords

  • mixing
  • North Atlantic
  • silicic acid
  • zinc

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Water mass mixing : The dominant control on the zinc distribution in the North Atlantic Ocean. / Roshan, Saeed; Wu, Jingfeng.

In: Global Biogeochemical Cycles, Vol. 29, No. 7, 01.07.2015, p. 1060-1074.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Dissolved zinc (dZn) concentration was determined in the North Atlantic during the U.S. GEOTRACES 2010 and 2011 cruise (GOETRACES GA03). A relatively poor linear correlation (R20.756) was observed between dZn and silicic acid (Si), the slope of which was 0.0577nM/μmol/kg. We attribute the relatively poor dZn-Si correlation to the following processes: (a) differential regeneration of zinc relative to silicic acid, (b) mixing of multiple water masses that have different Zn/Si, and (c) zinc sources such as sedimentary or hydrothermal. To quantitatively distinguish these possibilities, we use the results of Optimum Multi-Parameter Water Mass Analysis by Jenkins et al. (2015) to model the zinc distribution below 500m. We hypothesized two scenarios: conservative mixing and regenerative mixing. The first scenario (conservative) could be modeled to results in a correlation with observations with a R20.846. In the second scenario, we took a Si-related regeneration into account, which could model the observations with a R20.867. Through this regenerative mixing scenario, we estimated a Zn/Si0.0548nM/μmol/kg that may be more realistic than linear regression slope due to accounting for process b. However, this did not improve the model substantially (R20.867 versus0.846), which may indicate the insignificant effect of remineralization on the zinc distribution in this region. The relative weakness in the model-observation correlation (R2~0.85 for both scenarios) implies that processes (a) and (c) may be plausible. Furthermore, dZn in the upper 500m exhibited a very poor correlation with apparent oxygen utilization, suggesting a minimal role for the organic matter-associated remineralization process. Key Points Dissolved zinc shows a relatively weak correlation with silicic acid in the North Atlantic Dissolved zinc in the North Atlantic is mainly controlled by water mass mixing Some water mass end-members exhibit deviations in the Zn-Si correlation",
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