Volunteer Work, Religious Commitment, and Resting Pulse Rates

Neal Krause, Gail Ironson, Peter C. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Research indicates that greater involvement in volunteer activities is associated with better health. We aim to contribute to this literature in two ways. First, rather than rely on self-reports of health, measured resting pulse rates serve as the dependent variable. Second, an effort is made to see if religious commitment moderates the relationship between volunteering and resting pulse rates. Data that come from a recent nationwide survey (N = 2265) suggest that volunteer work is associated with lower resting pulse rates. The results also reveal that the relationship between engaging in volunteer work and resting pulse rates improves among study participants who are more deeply committed to religion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)591-603
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

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Volunteers
Heart Rate
Health
Religion
Self Report
Pulse
Religious Commitment
Research

Keywords

  • Religious commitment
  • Resting pulse rates
  • Volunteering

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Medicine(all)
  • Religious studies

Cite this

Volunteer Work, Religious Commitment, and Resting Pulse Rates. / Krause, Neal; Ironson, Gail; Hill, Peter C.

In: Journal of Religion and Health, Vol. 56, No. 2, 01.04.2017, p. 591-603.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Krause, Neal ; Ironson, Gail ; Hill, Peter C. / Volunteer Work, Religious Commitment, and Resting Pulse Rates. In: Journal of Religion and Health. 2017 ; Vol. 56, No. 2. pp. 591-603.
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