Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada

Joost A. de Gouw, C. Warneke, A. Stohl, A. G. Wollny, C. A. Brock, O. R. Cooper, J. S. Holloway, M. Trainer, F. C. Fehsenfeld, Elliot L Atlas, S. G. Donnelly, V. Stroud, A. Lueb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

121 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The NOAA WP-3 aircraft intercepted aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada during several flights of the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 mission in 2004. Measurements of acetonitrile (CH3CN) indicated that the air masses had been influenced by biomass burning. The locations of the plume intercepts were well described using emissions estimates and calculations with the transport model FLEXPART. The best description of the data was generally obtained when FLEXPART injected the forest fire emissions to high altitudes in the model. The observed plumes were generally drier than the surrounding air masses at the same altitude, suggesting that the fire plumes had been processed by clouds and that moisture had been removed by precipitation. Different degrees of photochemical processing of the plumes were determined from the measurements of aromatic VOCs. The removal of aromatic VOCs was slow considering the transport times estimated from the FLEXPART model. This suggests that the average OH levels were low during the transport, which may be explained by the low humidity and high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other pollutants. In contrast with previous work, no strong secondary production of acetone, methanol and acetic acid is inferred from the measurements. A clear case of removal of submicron particle volume and acetic acid due to precipitation scavenging was observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberD10303
JournalJournal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans
Volume111
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - May 27 2006

Fingerprint

forest fires
Volatile Organic Compounds
volatile organic compounds
forest fire
Canada
plumes
volatile organic compound
Fires
plume
Volatile organic compounds
Acetic Acid
Chemical analysis
air masses
acetic acid
Precipitation (meteorology)
air mass
Scavenging
acids
Carbon Monoxide
Acetone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Geophysics
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Atmospheric Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
  • Oceanography

Cite this

de Gouw, J. A., Warneke, C., Stohl, A., Wollny, A. G., Brock, C. A., Cooper, O. R., ... Lueb, A. (2006). Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada. Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans, 111(10), [D10303]. https://doi.org/10.1029/2005JD006175

Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada. / de Gouw, Joost A.; Warneke, C.; Stohl, A.; Wollny, A. G.; Brock, C. A.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Trainer, M.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.; Atlas, Elliot L; Donnelly, S. G.; Stroud, V.; Lueb, A.

In: Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans, Vol. 111, No. 10, D10303, 27.05.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

de Gouw, JA, Warneke, C, Stohl, A, Wollny, AG, Brock, CA, Cooper, OR, Holloway, JS, Trainer, M, Fehsenfeld, FC, Atlas, EL, Donnelly, SG, Stroud, V & Lueb, A 2006, 'Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada', Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans, vol. 111, no. 10, D10303. https://doi.org/10.1029/2005JD006175
de Gouw, Joost A. ; Warneke, C. ; Stohl, A. ; Wollny, A. G. ; Brock, C. A. ; Cooper, O. R. ; Holloway, J. S. ; Trainer, M. ; Fehsenfeld, F. C. ; Atlas, Elliot L ; Donnelly, S. G. ; Stroud, V. ; Lueb, A. / Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada. In: Journal of Geophysical Research C: Oceans. 2006 ; Vol. 111, No. 10.
@article{faa776fa2e3d49db8e893c3c23383ac9,
title = "Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada",
abstract = "The NOAA WP-3 aircraft intercepted aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada during several flights of the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 mission in 2004. Measurements of acetonitrile (CH3CN) indicated that the air masses had been influenced by biomass burning. The locations of the plume intercepts were well described using emissions estimates and calculations with the transport model FLEXPART. The best description of the data was generally obtained when FLEXPART injected the forest fire emissions to high altitudes in the model. The observed plumes were generally drier than the surrounding air masses at the same altitude, suggesting that the fire plumes had been processed by clouds and that moisture had been removed by precipitation. Different degrees of photochemical processing of the plumes were determined from the measurements of aromatic VOCs. The removal of aromatic VOCs was slow considering the transport times estimated from the FLEXPART model. This suggests that the average OH levels were low during the transport, which may be explained by the low humidity and high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other pollutants. In contrast with previous work, no strong secondary production of acetone, methanol and acetic acid is inferred from the measurements. A clear case of removal of submicron particle volume and acetic acid due to precipitation scavenging was observed.",
author = "{de Gouw}, {Joost A.} and C. Warneke and A. Stohl and Wollny, {A. G.} and Brock, {C. A.} and Cooper, {O. R.} and Holloway, {J. S.} and M. Trainer and Fehsenfeld, {F. C.} and Atlas, {Elliot L} and Donnelly, {S. G.} and V. Stroud and A. Lueb",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1029/2005JD006175",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "111",
journal = "Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans",
issn = "2169-9275",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Volatile organic compounds composition of merged and aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada

AU - de Gouw, Joost A.

AU - Warneke, C.

AU - Stohl, A.

AU - Wollny, A. G.

AU - Brock, C. A.

AU - Cooper, O. R.

AU - Holloway, J. S.

AU - Trainer, M.

AU - Fehsenfeld, F. C.

AU - Atlas, Elliot L

AU - Donnelly, S. G.

AU - Stroud, V.

AU - Lueb, A.

PY - 2006/5/27

Y1 - 2006/5/27

N2 - The NOAA WP-3 aircraft intercepted aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada during several flights of the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 mission in 2004. Measurements of acetonitrile (CH3CN) indicated that the air masses had been influenced by biomass burning. The locations of the plume intercepts were well described using emissions estimates and calculations with the transport model FLEXPART. The best description of the data was generally obtained when FLEXPART injected the forest fire emissions to high altitudes in the model. The observed plumes were generally drier than the surrounding air masses at the same altitude, suggesting that the fire plumes had been processed by clouds and that moisture had been removed by precipitation. Different degrees of photochemical processing of the plumes were determined from the measurements of aromatic VOCs. The removal of aromatic VOCs was slow considering the transport times estimated from the FLEXPART model. This suggests that the average OH levels were low during the transport, which may be explained by the low humidity and high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other pollutants. In contrast with previous work, no strong secondary production of acetone, methanol and acetic acid is inferred from the measurements. A clear case of removal of submicron particle volume and acetic acid due to precipitation scavenging was observed.

AB - The NOAA WP-3 aircraft intercepted aged forest fire plumes from Alaska and western Canada during several flights of the NEAQS-ITCT 2k4 mission in 2004. Measurements of acetonitrile (CH3CN) indicated that the air masses had been influenced by biomass burning. The locations of the plume intercepts were well described using emissions estimates and calculations with the transport model FLEXPART. The best description of the data was generally obtained when FLEXPART injected the forest fire emissions to high altitudes in the model. The observed plumes were generally drier than the surrounding air masses at the same altitude, suggesting that the fire plumes had been processed by clouds and that moisture had been removed by precipitation. Different degrees of photochemical processing of the plumes were determined from the measurements of aromatic VOCs. The removal of aromatic VOCs was slow considering the transport times estimated from the FLEXPART model. This suggests that the average OH levels were low during the transport, which may be explained by the low humidity and high concentrations of carbon monoxide and other pollutants. In contrast with previous work, no strong secondary production of acetone, methanol and acetic acid is inferred from the measurements. A clear case of removal of submicron particle volume and acetic acid due to precipitation scavenging was observed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33745903879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33745903879&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1029/2005JD006175

DO - 10.1029/2005JD006175

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:33745903879

VL - 111

JO - Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

JF - Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans

SN - 2169-9275

IS - 10

M1 - D10303

ER -