Vitamin D status among preterm infants with cholestasis and metabolic bone disease

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Metabolic bone disease of prematurity (MBD) is a common problem among preterm infants. Our previous study identified cholestasis as an important risk factor for the development of MBD. We conducted this study to determine the vitamin D status in preterm infants with MBD and cholestasis. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical record of preterm infants evaluated in NICU at Holtz Children’s/Jackson Memorial Hospital between June 2014 and May 2016. Demographic, biochemical data, and vitamin D intake were collected and analyzed. Results: We identified 58 preterm infants (median gestational age 25 weeks) with MBD during this period. Twenty five infants also developed cholestasis. Median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level at the time of diagnosis of MBD was similar in cholestasis (C), (29.1 ng/ml, IQR 24.4–33.5), and non-cholestasis (NC), (28.7 ng/ml, IQR 22.7–34.6), group (p = 0.41). At the second measurement, average 6 weeks after the first measurement; median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was lower (p = 0.02) in the C group (31.2 ng/ml, IQR 23.0–38.8) than in the NC group (36.5 ng/ml, IQR 28–45). However, the actual percentage of infants with vitamin D deficiency was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Most preterm infants with cholestasis and MBD had normal vitamin D status.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatric Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019

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Metabolic Bone Diseases
Cholestasis
Premature Infants
Vitamin D
Vitamin D Deficiency
Serum
Gestational Age
Medical Records
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

@article{b44df6f0da9f46e7be8ab7a7553df92a,
title = "Vitamin D status among preterm infants with cholestasis and metabolic bone disease",
abstract = "Background: Metabolic bone disease of prematurity (MBD) is a common problem among preterm infants. Our previous study identified cholestasis as an important risk factor for the development of MBD. We conducted this study to determine the vitamin D status in preterm infants with MBD and cholestasis. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical record of preterm infants evaluated in NICU at Holtz Children’s/Jackson Memorial Hospital between June 2014 and May 2016. Demographic, biochemical data, and vitamin D intake were collected and analyzed. Results: We identified 58 preterm infants (median gestational age 25 weeks) with MBD during this period. Twenty five infants also developed cholestasis. Median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level at the time of diagnosis of MBD was similar in cholestasis (C), (29.1 ng/ml, IQR 24.4–33.5), and non-cholestasis (NC), (28.7 ng/ml, IQR 22.7–34.6), group (p = 0.41). At the second measurement, average 6 weeks after the first measurement; median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was lower (p = 0.02) in the C group (31.2 ng/ml, IQR 23.0–38.8) than in the NC group (36.5 ng/ml, IQR 28–45). However, the actual percentage of infants with vitamin D deficiency was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Most preterm infants with cholestasis and MBD had normal vitamin D status.",
author = "Supamit Ukarapong and Walter Zegarra and Cristina Navarrete and Tossaporn Seeherunvong and Gary Berkovitz",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41390-019-0501-x",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "Pediatric Research",
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T1 - Vitamin D status among preterm infants with cholestasis and metabolic bone disease

AU - Ukarapong, Supamit

AU - Zegarra, Walter

AU - Navarrete, Cristina

AU - Seeherunvong, Tossaporn

AU - Berkovitz, Gary

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Background: Metabolic bone disease of prematurity (MBD) is a common problem among preterm infants. Our previous study identified cholestasis as an important risk factor for the development of MBD. We conducted this study to determine the vitamin D status in preterm infants with MBD and cholestasis. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical record of preterm infants evaluated in NICU at Holtz Children’s/Jackson Memorial Hospital between June 2014 and May 2016. Demographic, biochemical data, and vitamin D intake were collected and analyzed. Results: We identified 58 preterm infants (median gestational age 25 weeks) with MBD during this period. Twenty five infants also developed cholestasis. Median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level at the time of diagnosis of MBD was similar in cholestasis (C), (29.1 ng/ml, IQR 24.4–33.5), and non-cholestasis (NC), (28.7 ng/ml, IQR 22.7–34.6), group (p = 0.41). At the second measurement, average 6 weeks after the first measurement; median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was lower (p = 0.02) in the C group (31.2 ng/ml, IQR 23.0–38.8) than in the NC group (36.5 ng/ml, IQR 28–45). However, the actual percentage of infants with vitamin D deficiency was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Most preterm infants with cholestasis and MBD had normal vitamin D status.

AB - Background: Metabolic bone disease of prematurity (MBD) is a common problem among preterm infants. Our previous study identified cholestasis as an important risk factor for the development of MBD. We conducted this study to determine the vitamin D status in preterm infants with MBD and cholestasis. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical record of preterm infants evaluated in NICU at Holtz Children’s/Jackson Memorial Hospital between June 2014 and May 2016. Demographic, biochemical data, and vitamin D intake were collected and analyzed. Results: We identified 58 preterm infants (median gestational age 25 weeks) with MBD during this period. Twenty five infants also developed cholestasis. Median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level at the time of diagnosis of MBD was similar in cholestasis (C), (29.1 ng/ml, IQR 24.4–33.5), and non-cholestasis (NC), (28.7 ng/ml, IQR 22.7–34.6), group (p = 0.41). At the second measurement, average 6 weeks after the first measurement; median serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level was lower (p = 0.02) in the C group (31.2 ng/ml, IQR 23.0–38.8) than in the NC group (36.5 ng/ml, IQR 28–45). However, the actual percentage of infants with vitamin D deficiency was similar in both the groups. Conclusion: Most preterm infants with cholestasis and MBD had normal vitamin D status.

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