Vitamin D deficiency and seasonal variation in an adult south Florida population

Silvina Levis, Angela Gomez, Camilo Jimenez, Luis Veras, Fangchao Ma, Shenghan Lai, Bruce Hollis, Bernard A. Roos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

177 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hypovitaminosis D is associated with impaired neuromuscular function, bone loss, and fractures. If a person is not taking a vitamin supplement, sun exposure is often the greatest source of vitamin D. Thus, vitamin D deficiency is not uncommon in the winter, particularly in northern latitudes. Our goal was to establish the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in south Florida (U.S.), a region of year-round sunny weather. At the end of the winter, 212 men and women attending an internal medicine clinic at a local county hospital were enrolled for measurements of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D], 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, and PTH; 99 participants returned at the end of summer. The mean (±SD) winter 25(OH)D concentration was 24.9 ± 8.7 ng/ml (62.3 ± 21.8 nmol/liter) in men and 22.4 ± 8.2 ng/ml (56.0 ± 20.5 nmol/liter) in women. In winter, the prevalence of hypovitaminosis D, defined as 25(OH)D less than 20 ng/ml (50 nmol/liter), was 38% and 40% in men and women, respectively. In the 99 subjects who returned for the end of summer visit, the mean 25(OH)D concentration was 31.0 ± 11.0 ng/ml (77.5 ± 27.5 nmol/liter) in men and 25.0 ± 9.4 ng/ml (62.5 ± 23.5 nmol/liter) in women. Seasonal variation represented a 14% summer increase in 25(OH)D concentrations in men and a 13% increase in women, both of which were statistically significant. The prevalence of hypovitaminosis D is considerable even in southern latitudes and should be taken into account in the evaluation of postmenopausal and male osteoporosis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1557-1562
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume90
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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Vitamin D Deficiency
Vitamin D
Population
Vitamins
Sun
Bone
County Hospitals
Postmenopausal Osteoporosis
Bone Fractures
Weather
Solar System
Internal Medicine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Vitamin D deficiency and seasonal variation in an adult south Florida population. / Levis, Silvina; Gomez, Angela; Jimenez, Camilo; Veras, Luis; Ma, Fangchao; Lai, Shenghan; Hollis, Bruce; Roos, Bernard A.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 90, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 1557-1562.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Levis, Silvina ; Gomez, Angela ; Jimenez, Camilo ; Veras, Luis ; Ma, Fangchao ; Lai, Shenghan ; Hollis, Bruce ; Roos, Bernard A. / Vitamin D deficiency and seasonal variation in an adult south Florida population. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2005 ; Vol. 90, No. 3. pp. 1557-1562.
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