Visual rehabilitation with limbal autologous stem cells transplant and cataract surgery in a patient with ocular surface squamous neoplasia

Eduardo J. Polania-Baron, Enrique O. Graue-Hernandez, Arturo Ramirez-Miranda, Guillermo Amescua, Alejandro Navas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To describe the outcome of simple limbal epithelial transplantation along with Phacoemulsification and IOL implantation for visual rehabilitation in limbal stem cell deficiency due to ocular surface squamous neoplasia. Observations: This case report of a 66-year-old woman clinically diagnosed with OSSN in her right eye involving all cornea and limbus meridians. Topical chemotherapy for tumor treatment was done, followed by SLET and sequential cataract surgery. The entire tumor could be clinically reduced with topical chemotherapy but a LSCD could not be avoided. After SLET, corneal transparency was restored, and anterior segment details could be seen, phacoemulsification was performed uneventfully. After a follow-up period of 18 months, stable ocular surface and visual acuity and no tumor recurrence was observed. Conclusions: SLET is an option to restore not only corneal epithelium homeostasis but also gain cornea transparency, avoid keratoplasties and allow anterior segment surgeries to be performed. Importance: This case report provide evidence of benefits of simple limbal epithelial transplantation in ocular surface squamous neoplasia and shows that cataract surgery could be performed uneventfully after limbal stem cell transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number101167
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology Case Reports
Volume23
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Limbal stem cell deficiency
  • Ocular surface squamous neoplasia
  • Simple limbal epithelial transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology

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