Virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses select for amino-acid variation in simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Nef

David T. Evans, David H. O'Connor, Peicheng Jing, John L. Dzuris, John Sidney, Jack Da Silva, Todd M. Allen, Helen Horton, John E. Venham, Richard A. Rudersdorf, Thorsten Vogel, C. David Pauza, Ronald E. Bontrop, Robert Demars, Alessandro Sette, Austin L. Hughes, David Watkins

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

349 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses to human immunodeficiency virus arise early after infection, but ultimately fail to prevent progression to AIDS. Human immunodeficiency virus may evade the CTL response by accumulating amino-acid replacements within CTL epitopes. We studied 10 CTL epitopes during the course of simian immunodeficiency virus disease progression in three related macaques. All 10 of these CTL epitopes accumulated amino-acid replacements and showed evidence of positive selection by the time the macaques died. Many of the amino-acid replacements in these epitopes reduced or eliminated major histocompatibility complex class I binding and/or CTL recognition. These findings strongly support the CTL 'escape' hypothesis.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1270-1276
Number of pages7
JournalNature Medicine
Volume5
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Simian Immunodeficiency Virus
T-cells
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Viruses
T-Lymphocyte Epitopes
Amino Acids
Macaca
Epitopes
HIV
Virus Diseases
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Disease Progression
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses select for amino-acid variation in simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Nef. / Evans, David T.; O'Connor, David H.; Jing, Peicheng; Dzuris, John L.; Sidney, John; Da Silva, Jack; Allen, Todd M.; Horton, Helen; Venham, John E.; Rudersdorf, Richard A.; Vogel, Thorsten; Pauza, C. David; Bontrop, Ronald E.; Demars, Robert; Sette, Alessandro; Hughes, Austin L.; Watkins, David.

In: Nature Medicine, Vol. 5, No. 11, 01.11.1999, p. 1270-1276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Evans, DT, O'Connor, DH, Jing, P, Dzuris, JL, Sidney, J, Da Silva, J, Allen, TM, Horton, H, Venham, JE, Rudersdorf, RA, Vogel, T, Pauza, CD, Bontrop, RE, Demars, R, Sette, A, Hughes, AL & Watkins, D 1999, 'Virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses select for amino-acid variation in simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Nef', Nature Medicine, vol. 5, no. 11, pp. 1270-1276. https://doi.org/10.1038/15224
Evans, David T. ; O'Connor, David H. ; Jing, Peicheng ; Dzuris, John L. ; Sidney, John ; Da Silva, Jack ; Allen, Todd M. ; Horton, Helen ; Venham, John E. ; Rudersdorf, Richard A. ; Vogel, Thorsten ; Pauza, C. David ; Bontrop, Ronald E. ; Demars, Robert ; Sette, Alessandro ; Hughes, Austin L. ; Watkins, David. / Virus-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses select for amino-acid variation in simian immunodeficiency virus Env and Nef. In: Nature Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 5, No. 11. pp. 1270-1276.
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