Viral organization of human proteins

Stefan Wuchty, Geoffrey Siwo, Michael T. Ferdig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF) allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere11796
JournalPLoS One
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Proteins
proteins
Host-Pathogen Interactions
Viral Proteins
Pathogens
Viruses
HIV
viruses
host-pathogen relationships
viral proteins
disease prevention
HIV infections
Protein Kinases
HIV Infections
Human immunodeficiency virus 1
HIV-1
protein kinases
topology
Transcription Factors
pathogenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Viral organization of human proteins. / Wuchty, Stefan; Siwo, Geoffrey; Ferdig, Michael T.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 5, No. 8, e11796, 2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wuchty, Stefan ; Siwo, Geoffrey ; Ferdig, Michael T. / Viral organization of human proteins. In: PLoS One. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 8.
@article{8c097377f6f141ecbc825bc78f46e03e,
title = "Viral organization of human proteins",
abstract = "Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF) allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.",
author = "Stefan Wuchty and Geoffrey Siwo and Ferdig, {Michael T.}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0011796",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
journal = "PLoS One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Viral organization of human proteins

AU - Wuchty, Stefan

AU - Siwo, Geoffrey

AU - Ferdig, Michael T.

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF) allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

AB - Although maps of intracellular interactions are increasingly well characterized, little is known about large-scale maps of host-pathogen protein interactions. The investigation of host-pathogen interactions can reveal features of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for the development of drugs and disease prevention strategies. A compilation of experimentally verified interactions between HIV-1 and human proteins and a set of HIV-dependency factors (HDF) allowed insights into the topology and intricate interplay between viral and host proteins on a large scale. We found that targeted and HDF proteins appear predominantly in rich-clubs, groups of human proteins that are strongly intertwined among each other. These assemblies of proteins may serve as an infection gateway, allowing the virus to take control of the human host by reaching protein pathways and diversified cellular functions in a pronounced and focused way. Particular transcription factors and protein kinases facilitate indirect interactions between HDFs and viral proteins. Discerning the entanglement of directly targeted and indirectly interacting proteins may uncover molecular and functional sites that can provide novel perspectives on the progression of HIV infection and highlight new avenues to fight this virus.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77957869184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77957869184&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0011796

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0011796

M3 - Article

C2 - 20827298

AN - SCOPUS:77957869184

VL - 5

JO - PLoS One

JF - PLoS One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

M1 - e11796

ER -