Videotaping effects on the behaviors of low income mothers and their infants during floor-play interactions

Tiffany M Field, Edward Ignatoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Interaction behaviors and language measures of low income mothers and their 12-month-old infants were compared for floor-play situations in which the mother was aware and unaware of being videotaped. When the mothers were aware of being videotaped, they were more proximal to their infants, offered and demonstrated toys more frequently, engaged in more frequent interaction games, vocalized more frequently, emitted a greater number of words as well as declarative and imperative utterances, and their infants engaged in more constructive play. Combining the analysis of variance and correlational analyses results suggested that the verbal behaviors of mothers were inflated and their non-verbal behaviors were distorted when they were aware of being videotaped. The implications of these data for the use of videotaping as an assessment and intervention tool are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-235
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Applied Developmental Psychology
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 23 1981

Fingerprint

infant
low income
Mothers
interaction
Analysis of Variance
interaction behavior
Verbal Behavior
Play and Playthings
language behavior
toy
analysis of variance
Language
language

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Education

Cite this

Videotaping effects on the behaviors of low income mothers and their infants during floor-play interactions. / Field, Tiffany M; Ignatoff, Edward.

In: Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, Vol. 2, No. 3, 23.01.1981, p. 227-235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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