Vesicle photonics

A. E. Vasdekis, E. A. Scott, S. Roke, J. A. Hubbell, D. Psaltis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Amphiphiles, under appropriate conditions, can self-assemble into nanoscale thin membrane vessels (vesicles) that encapsulate and hence protect and transport molecular payloads. Vesicles assemble naturally within cells but can also be artificially synthesized. In this article, we review the mechanisms and applications of light-field interactions with vesicles. By being associated with light-emitting entities (e.g., dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as imaging agents in addition to cargo carriers. Vesicles can also be optically probed on the basis of their nonlinear response, typically from the vesicle membrane. Light fields can be employed to transport vesicles by using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or can directly perturb the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy). We conclude with emerging vesicle applications in biology and photochemical microreactors. ©

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-305
Number of pages23
JournalAnnual Review of Materials Research
Volume43
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Photonics
Photons
Membranes
Optical tweezers
Amphiphiles
Fluorescent Dyes
Semiconductor quantum dots
Momentum
Dyes
Proteins
Imaging techniques

Keywords

  • Biophotonics
  • Drug delivery
  • Liposomes
  • Optics
  • Polymersomes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)

Cite this

Vasdekis, A. E., Scott, E. A., Roke, S., Hubbell, J. A., & Psaltis, D. (2013). Vesicle photonics. Annual Review of Materials Research, 43, 283-305. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-matsci-071312-121724

Vesicle photonics. / Vasdekis, A. E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, S.; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

In: Annual Review of Materials Research, Vol. 43, 01.07.2013, p. 283-305.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vasdekis, AE, Scott, EA, Roke, S, Hubbell, JA & Psaltis, D 2013, 'Vesicle photonics', Annual Review of Materials Research, vol. 43, pp. 283-305. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-matsci-071312-121724
Vasdekis AE, Scott EA, Roke S, Hubbell JA, Psaltis D. Vesicle photonics. Annual Review of Materials Research. 2013 Jul 1;43:283-305. https://doi.org/10.1146/annurev-matsci-071312-121724
Vasdekis, A. E. ; Scott, E. A. ; Roke, S. ; Hubbell, J. A. ; Psaltis, D. / Vesicle photonics. In: Annual Review of Materials Research. 2013 ; Vol. 43. pp. 283-305.
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