Very-low-birth-weight outcomes of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Network, November 1989 to October 1990

Maureen Hack, Linda L. Wright, Seetha Shankaran, Jon E. Tyson, Jeffrey D. Horbar, Charles R. Bauer, Naji Younes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

162 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to describe the neonatal outcomes of 1804 very-low-brith-weight (≤1500 gm) infants delivered between November 1989 and October 1990 in the participating centers of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Neonatal Research. STUDY DESIGN: In an observational study sociodemographic, pregnancy, and delivery data were collected soon after birth, and neonatal and outcome data at discharge, at 120 days, or at death. RESULTS: Maternal and birth weight characteristics included 64% black, 29% white; 71% single mothers; 18% no prenatal care; 17% antenatal steroids; and 12% multiple gestations. Birth weight distributions included 18% weighing 501 to 750 gm, 23% 751 to 1000 gm, 28% 1001 to 1250 gm, and 31% 1251 to 1500 gm. Survival was 39% at < 751 gm birth weight, 77% at 751 to 1000 gm, 90% at 1001 to 1250 gm, and 93% at 1251 to 1500 gm. Survival was 15% to 18% at ≤ 23 weeks' gestation, 54% at 24 weeks, 59% at 25 weeks, and 71% at 26 weeks. Surfactant was administered to 45% of the 56% of infants with respiratory distress syndrome. Morbidity, including intraventricular hemorrhage (40%), septicemia (24%), symptomatic poatent ductus arteriosus (22%), and necrotizing entercolitis (8%), increased with decreasing birth weight. Oxygen was administered for ≥ 28 days to 82% of < 751 gm infants, 49% of 751 to 1000 gm infants, and 10% of > 1001 gm infants. Steroids were admiistered to 28% of infants who required oxygen for ≥ 28 days. Mean hospital stay was 62 days for survivors and 18 days for infants who died. There were large intercenter variations in mortality and morbidity. CONCLUSION: Mortality and morbidity in very-low-birth-weight infants improved in 1989 to 1990 without an increase in morbidity or length of hospital stay. The threshold of the improved survival was ≥24 weeks and 601 to 700 gm. Although such data are reassuring, the rate of major morbidity in < 1001 gm birth weight infants continues to be high.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)457-464
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican journal of obstetrics and gynecology
Volume172
Issue number2 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1995

Keywords

  • morbidity
  • mortality
  • neonatal
  • Very low brith weight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Medicine(all)

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