Using anthropomorphic avatars resembling sedentary older individuals as models to enhance self-efficacy and adherence to physical activity: Psychophysiological correlates

Jorge G. Ruiz, Allen D. Andrade, Ramankumar Anam, Rudxandra Aguiar, Huaping Sun, Bernard A. Roos

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of obesity and associated health complications are currently at unprecedented levels. Physical activity in this population can improve patient outcomes. Virtual reality (VR) self-modeling may improve self-efficacy and adherence to physical activity. We conducted a comparative study of 30 participants randomized to 3 versions of a 3D avatar-based VR intervention about exercise: virtual representation of the self exercising condition; virtual representation of other person exercising and control condition. Participants in the virtual representation of the self group significantly increased their levels of physical activity. The improvement in physical activity for participants in the visual representation of other person exercising was marginal. The improvement for the control group was not significant. However, the effect sizes for comparing the pre and post intervention physical activity levels were quite large for all three groups. We did not find any group difference in the improvements of physical activity levels and self-efficacy among sedentary, overweight or obese individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 19
Subtitle of host publicationNextMed, MMVR 2012
PublisherIOS Press
Pages405-411
Number of pages7
ISBN (Print)9781614990215
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012
EventMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 19: NextMed, MMVR 2012 - Newport Beach, CA, United States
Duration: Feb 9 2012Feb 11 2012

Publication series

NameStudies in Health Technology and Informatics
Volume173
ISSN (Print)0926-9630
ISSN (Electronic)1879-8365

Other

OtherMedicine Meets Virtual Reality 19: NextMed, MMVR 2012
CountryUnited States
CityNewport Beach, CA
Period2/9/122/11/12

Keywords

  • Avatars
  • Physical activity
  • Psychophysiological measures
  • Sedentarism
  • Virtual modeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Health Informatics
  • Health Information Management

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