Use of the song repertoire in intersexual and intrasexual contexts by male red-winged blackbirds

William Searcy, K. Yasukawa

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Territorial male Agelaius phoeniceus switched song types more frequently and sang more song types in response to presentation of a female stimulus than during control periods, but decreased their switching frequency when a male stimulus was presented. Switching frequency in response to the female stimulus was 3 times that in response to the male stimulus. Results support the hypothesis that song repertoires of male red-winged blackbirds evolved primarily in response to intersexual rather than intrasexual selection. They also suggest that male red-winged blackbirds have been selected to de-emphasize their song repertoires during encounters with conspecific males as a result of some as yet unidentified cost. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBehavioral Ecology & Sociobiology
Pages123-128
Number of pages6
Volume27
Edition2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1990
Externally publishedYes

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Searcy, W., & Yasukawa, K. (1990). Use of the song repertoire in intersexual and intrasexual contexts by male red-winged blackbirds. In Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology (2 ed., Vol. 27, pp. 123-128)

Use of the song repertoire in intersexual and intrasexual contexts by male red-winged blackbirds. / Searcy, William; Yasukawa, K.

Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology. Vol. 27 2. ed. 1990. p. 123-128.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Searcy, W & Yasukawa, K 1990, Use of the song repertoire in intersexual and intrasexual contexts by male red-winged blackbirds. in Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology. 2 edn, vol. 27, pp. 123-128.
Searcy W, Yasukawa K. Use of the song repertoire in intersexual and intrasexual contexts by male red-winged blackbirds. In Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology. 2 ed. Vol. 27. 1990. p. 123-128
Searcy, William ; Yasukawa, K. / Use of the song repertoire in intersexual and intrasexual contexts by male red-winged blackbirds. Behavioral Ecology & Sociobiology. Vol. 27 2. ed. 1990. pp. 123-128
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