Use of the diabetes prevention trial-type 1 risk score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of the risk classification of type 1 diabetes

Jay M Sosenko, Jay S Skyler, Jeffrey Mahon, Jeffrey P. Krische, Carla J. Greenbaum, Lisa Rafkin, Craig A. Beam, David C. Boulware, Della Matheson, David Cuthbertson, Kevan C. Herold, George Eisenbarth, Jerry P. Palmer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We studied the utility of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk classification in TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The cumulative incidence of T1D was compared between normoglycemic individuals with DPTRS values >7.00 and dysglycemic individuals in the TNNHS (n = 991). It was also compared between individuals with DPTRS values <7.00 or >7.00 among those with dysglycemia and those with multiple autoantibodies in the TNNHS. DPTRS values >7.00 were compared with dysglycemia for characterizing risk in Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) (n = 670) and TNNHS participants. The reliability of DPTRS values >7.00 was compared with dysglycemia in the TNNHS. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of T1D for normoglycemic TNNHS participants with DPTRS values >7.00 was comparable to those with dysglycemia. Among those with dysglycemia, the cumulative incidence was much higher ( P < 0.001) for those with DPTRS values >7.00 than for those with values <7.00 (3-year risks: 0.16 for <7.00 and 0.46 for >7.00). Dysglycemic individuals in DPT-1 were at much higher risk for T1D than those with dysglycemia in the TNNHS (P < 0.001); there was no significant difference in risk between the studies among those with DPTRS values >7.00. The proportion in the TNNHS reverting from dysglycemia to normoglycemia at the next visit was higher than the proportion reverting from DPTRS values >7.00 to values <7.00 (36 vs. 23%). CONCLUSIONS: DPTRS thresholds can improve T1D risk classification accuracy by identifying high-risk normoglycemic and low-risk dysglycemic individuals. The 7.00 DPTRS threshold characterizes risk more consistently between populations and has greater reliability than dysglycemia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)979-984
Number of pages6
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Natural History
Incidence
Autoantibodies
Research Design

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

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Use of the diabetes prevention trial-type 1 risk score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of the risk classification of type 1 diabetes. / Sosenko, Jay M; Skyler, Jay S; Mahon, Jeffrey; Krische, Jeffrey P.; Greenbaum, Carla J.; Rafkin, Lisa; Beam, Craig A.; Boulware, David C.; Matheson, Della; Cuthbertson, David; Herold, Kevan C.; Eisenbarth, George; Palmer, Jerry P.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 37, No. 4, 01.01.2014, p. 979-984.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sosenko, JM, Skyler, JS, Mahon, J, Krische, JP, Greenbaum, CJ, Rafkin, L, Beam, CA, Boulware, DC, Matheson, D, Cuthbertson, D, Herold, KC, Eisenbarth, G & Palmer, JP 2014, 'Use of the diabetes prevention trial-type 1 risk score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of the risk classification of type 1 diabetes', Diabetes Care, vol. 37, no. 4, pp. 979-984. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc13-2359
Sosenko, Jay M ; Skyler, Jay S ; Mahon, Jeffrey ; Krische, Jeffrey P. ; Greenbaum, Carla J. ; Rafkin, Lisa ; Beam, Craig A. ; Boulware, David C. ; Matheson, Della ; Cuthbertson, David ; Herold, Kevan C. ; Eisenbarth, George ; Palmer, Jerry P. / Use of the diabetes prevention trial-type 1 risk score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of the risk classification of type 1 diabetes. In: Diabetes Care. 2014 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 979-984.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We studied the utility of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk classification in TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The cumulative incidence of T1D was compared between normoglycemic individuals with DPTRS values >7.00 and dysglycemic individuals in the TNNHS (n = 991). It was also compared between individuals with DPTRS values <7.00 or >7.00 among those with dysglycemia and those with multiple autoantibodies in the TNNHS. DPTRS values >7.00 were compared with dysglycemia for characterizing risk in Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) (n = 670) and TNNHS participants. The reliability of DPTRS values >7.00 was compared with dysglycemia in the TNNHS. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of T1D for normoglycemic TNNHS participants with DPTRS values >7.00 was comparable to those with dysglycemia. Among those with dysglycemia, the cumulative incidence was much higher ( P < 0.001) for those with DPTRS values >7.00 than for those with values <7.00 (3-year risks: 0.16 for <7.00 and 0.46 for >7.00). Dysglycemic individuals in DPT-1 were at much higher risk for T1D than those with dysglycemia in the TNNHS (P < 0.001); there was no significant difference in risk between the studies among those with DPTRS values >7.00. The proportion in the TNNHS reverting from dysglycemia to normoglycemia at the next visit was higher than the proportion reverting from DPTRS values >7.00 to values <7.00 (36 vs. 23{\%}). CONCLUSIONS: DPTRS thresholds can improve T1D risk classification accuracy by identifying high-risk normoglycemic and low-risk dysglycemic individuals. The 7.00 DPTRS threshold characterizes risk more consistently between populations and has greater reliability than dysglycemia.",
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AU - Krische, Jeffrey P.

AU - Greenbaum, Carla J.

AU - Rafkin, Lisa

AU - Beam, Craig A.

AU - Boulware, David C.

AU - Matheson, Della

AU - Cuthbertson, David

AU - Herold, Kevan C.

AU - Eisenbarth, George

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: We studied the utility of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk classification in TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The cumulative incidence of T1D was compared between normoglycemic individuals with DPTRS values >7.00 and dysglycemic individuals in the TNNHS (n = 991). It was also compared between individuals with DPTRS values <7.00 or >7.00 among those with dysglycemia and those with multiple autoantibodies in the TNNHS. DPTRS values >7.00 were compared with dysglycemia for characterizing risk in Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) (n = 670) and TNNHS participants. The reliability of DPTRS values >7.00 was compared with dysglycemia in the TNNHS. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of T1D for normoglycemic TNNHS participants with DPTRS values >7.00 was comparable to those with dysglycemia. Among those with dysglycemia, the cumulative incidence was much higher ( P < 0.001) for those with DPTRS values >7.00 than for those with values <7.00 (3-year risks: 0.16 for <7.00 and 0.46 for >7.00). Dysglycemic individuals in DPT-1 were at much higher risk for T1D than those with dysglycemia in the TNNHS (P < 0.001); there was no significant difference in risk between the studies among those with DPTRS values >7.00. The proportion in the TNNHS reverting from dysglycemia to normoglycemia at the next visit was higher than the proportion reverting from DPTRS values >7.00 to values <7.00 (36 vs. 23%). CONCLUSIONS: DPTRS thresholds can improve T1D risk classification accuracy by identifying high-risk normoglycemic and low-risk dysglycemic individuals. The 7.00 DPTRS threshold characterizes risk more consistently between populations and has greater reliability than dysglycemia.

AB - OBJECTIVE: We studied the utility of the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 Risk Score (DPTRS) for improving the accuracy of type 1 diabetes (T1D) risk classification in TrialNet Natural History Study (TNNHS) participants. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The cumulative incidence of T1D was compared between normoglycemic individuals with DPTRS values >7.00 and dysglycemic individuals in the TNNHS (n = 991). It was also compared between individuals with DPTRS values <7.00 or >7.00 among those with dysglycemia and those with multiple autoantibodies in the TNNHS. DPTRS values >7.00 were compared with dysglycemia for characterizing risk in Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1) (n = 670) and TNNHS participants. The reliability of DPTRS values >7.00 was compared with dysglycemia in the TNNHS. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of T1D for normoglycemic TNNHS participants with DPTRS values >7.00 was comparable to those with dysglycemia. Among those with dysglycemia, the cumulative incidence was much higher ( P < 0.001) for those with DPTRS values >7.00 than for those with values <7.00 (3-year risks: 0.16 for <7.00 and 0.46 for >7.00). Dysglycemic individuals in DPT-1 were at much higher risk for T1D than those with dysglycemia in the TNNHS (P < 0.001); there was no significant difference in risk between the studies among those with DPTRS values >7.00. The proportion in the TNNHS reverting from dysglycemia to normoglycemia at the next visit was higher than the proportion reverting from DPTRS values >7.00 to values <7.00 (36 vs. 23%). CONCLUSIONS: DPTRS thresholds can improve T1D risk classification accuracy by identifying high-risk normoglycemic and low-risk dysglycemic individuals. The 7.00 DPTRS threshold characterizes risk more consistently between populations and has greater reliability than dysglycemia.

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