Use of prenatal care by hispanic women after welfare reform

Elena Fuentes-Afflick, Nancy A. Hessol, Tamar Bauer, Mary J. O'Sullivan, Veronica Gomez-Lobo, Susan Holman, Tracey E. Wilson, Howard Minkoff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The 1996 Personal Responsibility Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA, "welfare reform") changed immigrants' eligibility for publicly funded services such as Medicaid. However, implementation of the PRWORA varied by state. Florida implemented the eligibility restrictions, while California and New York preserved eligibility. Our objective was to compare the effect of state of residence and immigration status on use of prenatal care among Hispanic women in the period following the enactment of PRWORA. METHODS: In 1999-2001, we interviewed 3,242 postpartum Hispanic women in California, Florida, and New York. The dependent variable was use of prenatal care, dichotomized as adequate (initiated during the first trimester and ≥ 6 visits, referent) or inadequate (initiated during the first trimester and < 6 prenatal visits or initiated after the first trimester). The primary independent variables were state of residence and maternal immigration status (U.S.-born citizens in New York, reference group). RESULTS: Thirteen percent of women were U.S.-born citizens, 8% were foreign-born citizens, 15% were documented immigrants, and 64% were undocumented immigrants. In Florida, women in all immigration subgroups were 2-4 times more likely to make inadequate use of prenatal care than U.S.-born citizens in New York. Documented immigrant women in New York were 90% more likely to make inadequate use of prenatal care than U.S.-born citizens in New York. CONCLUSION: Among Hispanic women in California, Florida, and New York, the state of residence, a measure of PRWORA policy changes, was associated with use of prenatal care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-160
Number of pages10
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology
Volume107
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Prenatal Care
Hispanic Americans
Emigration and Immigration
First Pregnancy Trimester
Medicaid
Postpartum Period
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Fuentes-Afflick, E., Hessol, N. A., Bauer, T., O'Sullivan, M. J., Gomez-Lobo, V., Holman, S., ... Minkoff, H. (2006). Use of prenatal care by hispanic women after welfare reform. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 107(1), 151-160.

Use of prenatal care by hispanic women after welfare reform. / Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Hessol, Nancy A.; Bauer, Tamar; O'Sullivan, Mary J.; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica; Holman, Susan; Wilson, Tracey E.; Minkoff, Howard.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 107, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 151-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fuentes-Afflick, E, Hessol, NA, Bauer, T, O'Sullivan, MJ, Gomez-Lobo, V, Holman, S, Wilson, TE & Minkoff, H 2006, 'Use of prenatal care by hispanic women after welfare reform', Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 107, no. 1, pp. 151-160.
Fuentes-Afflick E, Hessol NA, Bauer T, O'Sullivan MJ, Gomez-Lobo V, Holman S et al. Use of prenatal care by hispanic women after welfare reform. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2006 Jan 1;107(1):151-160.
Fuentes-Afflick, Elena ; Hessol, Nancy A. ; Bauer, Tamar ; O'Sullivan, Mary J. ; Gomez-Lobo, Veronica ; Holman, Susan ; Wilson, Tracey E. ; Minkoff, Howard. / Use of prenatal care by hispanic women after welfare reform. In: Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2006 ; Vol. 107, No. 1. pp. 151-160.
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