Use of mobile learning module improves skills in chest tube insertion

James S. Davis, George Garcia, Mary M. Wyckoff, Salman Alsafran, Jill M. Graygo, Kelly F. Withum, Carl I Schulman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Just-In-Time Learning is a concept increasingly applied to medical education, and its efficacy must be evaluated. Materials and methods: A 3-minute video on chest tube insertion was produced. Consenting participants were assigned to either the video group, which viewed the video on an Apple® iPod Touch immediately before chest tube insertion, or the control group, which received no instruction. Every participant filled out a questionnaire regarding prior chest tube experience. A trained clinician observed participants insert a chest tube on the TraumaMan® task simulator, and assessed performance using a 14-item skills checklist. Results: Overall, 128 healthcare trainees participated, with 50% in the video group. Participants included residents (34.4%, n = 44), medical students (32.8%, n = 42), and U.S. Army Forward Surgical Team members (32.8%, n = 42). Sixty-nine percent of all participants responded that they had never placed a chest tube, but 7% had placed more than 20. Only 25% of the participants had previously used TraumaMan®. Subjects who viewed the video scored better on the skills checklist than the control group (11.09 ± 3.09 versus 7.17 ± 3.56, P < 0.001, Cohen's D = 1.16). Medical students (9.33 ± 2.65 versus 4.52 ± 3.64, P < 0.001), Forward Surgical Team members (10.07 ± 2.52 versus 8.57 ± 3.22, P < 0.001), anesthesia residents (8.25 ± 2.56 versus 5.9 ± 2.23, P = 0.017), and subjects who had placed fewer than 10 chest tubes (9.7 ± 3 versus 6.6 ± 3.9, P < 0.001) performed significantly better with the video. Conclusions: The procedural animation video is an effective medium for teaching procedural skills. Embedding the video on a mobile device, and allowing trainees to access it immediately before chest tube insertion, may enhance and standardize surgical education for civilians and military personnel.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)21-26
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume177
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2012

Fingerprint

Chest Tubes
Learning
Checklist
Medical Students
Control Groups
Military Personnel
Touch
Malus
Medical Education
Teaching
Anesthesia
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Chest tube
  • Clinical simulation
  • Competency assessment
  • Mobile learning
  • Resident education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Use of mobile learning module improves skills in chest tube insertion. / Davis, James S.; Garcia, George; Wyckoff, Mary M.; Alsafran, Salman; Graygo, Jill M.; Withum, Kelly F.; Schulman, Carl I.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 177, No. 1, 01.09.2012, p. 21-26.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Davis, James S. ; Garcia, George ; Wyckoff, Mary M. ; Alsafran, Salman ; Graygo, Jill M. ; Withum, Kelly F. ; Schulman, Carl I. / Use of mobile learning module improves skills in chest tube insertion. In: Journal of Surgical Research. 2012 ; Vol. 177, No. 1. pp. 21-26.
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