US National Practice Patterns in Ambulatory Operative Management of Lateral Epicondylitis

Leonard T. Buller, Matthew J. Best, David Nigen, Marc Ialenti, Michael Baraga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Lateral epicondylitis is a common cause of elbow pain, frequently responsive to nonoperative management. There are multiple operative techniques for persistently symptomatic patients who have exhausted conservative therapies. Little is known regarding US national trends in operative management of lateral epicondylitis. We conducted a study to investigate changes in use of ambulatory procedures for lateral epicondylitis. Cases of lateral epicondylitis were identified using the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and were analyzed for trends in demographics and use of ambulatory surgery. Between 1994 and 2006, the population-adjusted rate of ambulatory surgical procedures increased from 7.29 to 10.44 per 100,000 capita. The sex-adjusted rate of surgery for lateral epicondylitis increased by 85% among females and decreased by 31% among males. Most patients were between ages 40 and 49 years, and the largest percentage increase in age-adjusted rates was found among patients older than 50 years (275%) between 1994 and 2006. Use of regional anesthesia increased from 17% in 1994 to 30% in 2006. Private insurance remained the most common payer. Awareness of the increasing use of ambulatory surgery for lateral epicondylitis may lead to changes in health care policies and positively affect patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E508-E512
JournalAmerican journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.)
Volume44
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

Fingerprint

Tennis Elbow
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Conduction Anesthesia
Elbow
Health Policy
Insurance
Patient Care
Demography
Delivery of Health Care
Pain
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

US National Practice Patterns in Ambulatory Operative Management of Lateral Epicondylitis. / Buller, Leonard T.; Best, Matthew J.; Nigen, David; Ialenti, Marc; Baraga, Michael.

In: American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.), Vol. 44, No. 12, 01.12.2015, p. E508-E512.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Buller, Leonard T. ; Best, Matthew J. ; Nigen, David ; Ialenti, Marc ; Baraga, Michael. / US National Practice Patterns in Ambulatory Operative Management of Lateral Epicondylitis. In: American journal of orthopedics (Belle Mead, N.J.). 2015 ; Vol. 44, No. 12. pp. E508-E512.
@article{31b2cc6d2d45470ca5abc4af7ba1a1e6,
title = "US National Practice Patterns in Ambulatory Operative Management of Lateral Epicondylitis",
abstract = "Lateral epicondylitis is a common cause of elbow pain, frequently responsive to nonoperative management. There are multiple operative techniques for persistently symptomatic patients who have exhausted conservative therapies. Little is known regarding US national trends in operative management of lateral epicondylitis. We conducted a study to investigate changes in use of ambulatory procedures for lateral epicondylitis. Cases of lateral epicondylitis were identified using the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and were analyzed for trends in demographics and use of ambulatory surgery. Between 1994 and 2006, the population-adjusted rate of ambulatory surgical procedures increased from 7.29 to 10.44 per 100,000 capita. The sex-adjusted rate of surgery for lateral epicondylitis increased by 85{\%} among females and decreased by 31{\%} among males. Most patients were between ages 40 and 49 years, and the largest percentage increase in age-adjusted rates was found among patients older than 50 years (275{\%}) between 1994 and 2006. Use of regional anesthesia increased from 17{\%} in 1994 to 30{\%} in 2006. Private insurance remained the most common payer. Awareness of the increasing use of ambulatory surgery for lateral epicondylitis may lead to changes in health care policies and positively affect patient care.",
author = "Buller, {Leonard T.} and Best, {Matthew J.} and David Nigen and Marc Ialenti and Michael Baraga",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "44",
pages = "E508--E512",
journal = "American Journal of Orthopedics",
issn = "1078-4519",
publisher = "Quadrant Healthcom Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - US National Practice Patterns in Ambulatory Operative Management of Lateral Epicondylitis

AU - Buller, Leonard T.

AU - Best, Matthew J.

AU - Nigen, David

AU - Ialenti, Marc

AU - Baraga, Michael

PY - 2015/12/1

Y1 - 2015/12/1

N2 - Lateral epicondylitis is a common cause of elbow pain, frequently responsive to nonoperative management. There are multiple operative techniques for persistently symptomatic patients who have exhausted conservative therapies. Little is known regarding US national trends in operative management of lateral epicondylitis. We conducted a study to investigate changes in use of ambulatory procedures for lateral epicondylitis. Cases of lateral epicondylitis were identified using the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and were analyzed for trends in demographics and use of ambulatory surgery. Between 1994 and 2006, the population-adjusted rate of ambulatory surgical procedures increased from 7.29 to 10.44 per 100,000 capita. The sex-adjusted rate of surgery for lateral epicondylitis increased by 85% among females and decreased by 31% among males. Most patients were between ages 40 and 49 years, and the largest percentage increase in age-adjusted rates was found among patients older than 50 years (275%) between 1994 and 2006. Use of regional anesthesia increased from 17% in 1994 to 30% in 2006. Private insurance remained the most common payer. Awareness of the increasing use of ambulatory surgery for lateral epicondylitis may lead to changes in health care policies and positively affect patient care.

AB - Lateral epicondylitis is a common cause of elbow pain, frequently responsive to nonoperative management. There are multiple operative techniques for persistently symptomatic patients who have exhausted conservative therapies. Little is known regarding US national trends in operative management of lateral epicondylitis. We conducted a study to investigate changes in use of ambulatory procedures for lateral epicondylitis. Cases of lateral epicondylitis were identified using the National Survey of Ambulatory Surgery and were analyzed for trends in demographics and use of ambulatory surgery. Between 1994 and 2006, the population-adjusted rate of ambulatory surgical procedures increased from 7.29 to 10.44 per 100,000 capita. The sex-adjusted rate of surgery for lateral epicondylitis increased by 85% among females and decreased by 31% among males. Most patients were between ages 40 and 49 years, and the largest percentage increase in age-adjusted rates was found among patients older than 50 years (275%) between 1994 and 2006. Use of regional anesthesia increased from 17% in 1994 to 30% in 2006. Private insurance remained the most common payer. Awareness of the increasing use of ambulatory surgery for lateral epicondylitis may lead to changes in health care policies and positively affect patient care.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84987984732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84987984732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 26665253

AN - SCOPUS:84987984732

VL - 44

SP - E508-E512

JO - American Journal of Orthopedics

JF - American Journal of Orthopedics

SN - 1078-4519

IS - 12

ER -