Urinary tract infection risk factors and gender.

R. D. Harrington, Thomas Hooton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are more common among women than men, although the prevalence in elderly men and women is similar. Most of the research on UTI has focused on young, sexually active women who are at high risk for developing an infection. The predominant UTI risk factors in young women are sexual intercourse and the use of spermicidal contraceptives. Other important UTI risk determinants in selected age groups include anatomic and physiologic factors, such as obstructing lesions and estrogen deficiency; genetic factors, such as blood group secretor status; antibiotic exposure; functional status; and possibly receptive anal intercourse and HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)27-34
Number of pages8
JournalThe journal of gender-specific medicine : JGSM : the official journal of the Partnership for Women"s Health at Columbia
Volume3
Issue number8
StatePublished - Nov 1 2000
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Urinary Tract Infections
Coitus
Blood Group Antigens
Contraceptive Agents
HIV Infections
Estrogens
Age Groups
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Infection
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

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