Updates on acute and chronic rejection in small bowel and multivisceral Allografts

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The surgical management of short bowel syndrome now includes intestinal (ITx) and multivisceral transplantation (MVTx), which has advanced and is now a sustainable option for the treatment of intestinal failure. Improvements in immunosuppressive therapies, excellence in surgical and medical management and enhanced post-transplant monitoring have all contributed to optimizing this solid organ transplant as a means of supplanting the diseased native bowel and alimentary tract with a functional alternative. RECENT FINDINGS: Post-transplant management is a critical and challenging phase of gastrointestinal transplantation, and the transplant pathologist is an essential member of the transplant team who identifies many of the early and late complications after ITx and MVTx. Among the most injurious and common complications of ITx and MVTx is acute rejection and, to a lesser degree, chronic rejection. Both of these broad categories of rejection are principally identified by histopathological changes in the allograft; however, biomarkers and other laboratory analytes are rapidly evolving into critical ancillary tools in identifying and further characterizing the rejection process. Thus, the transplant pathologist must also be able to utilize numerous other laboratory tests and panels of molecular biomarkers that provide supplementary information to accompany the biopsy interpretation and clinical suspicion of rejection. SUMMARY: Using biopsies and an assortment of additional approaches, the transplant pathologist is now able to provide swift and detailed information regarding the rejection process in the gastrointestinal transplant. This enables the clinical team to properly and successfully intercede, contributing to enhanced patient and graft survival.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-302
Number of pages10
JournalCurrent Opinion in Organ Transplantation
Volume19
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Allografts
Transplants
Transplantation
Biomarkers
Short Bowel Syndrome
Biopsy
Graft Survival
Immunosuppressive Agents
Treatment Failure
Pathologists

Keywords

  • intestinal transplantation
  • multivisceral transplantation
  • transplant pathology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Transplantation

Cite this

Updates on acute and chronic rejection in small bowel and multivisceral Allografts. / Ruiz, Phillip.

In: Current Opinion in Organ Transplantation, Vol. 19, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 293-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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