Update on psychiatric genetics

Stephan L Zuchner, Sushma T. Roberts, Marcy C. Speer, Jean C. Beckham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic factors play a fundamental role in the genesis of many mental disorders. The identification of the underlying genetic variation will therefore transform parts of psychiatry toward a neuroscience-based discipline. With the sequence of the human genome now available, the majority of common variations identified, and new high-throughput technologies arriving in academic research laboratories, the identification of genes is expected to explain a large proportion of the risk of developing mental disorders. So far, a number of risk genes have been identified, but no major gene has emerged. The majority of these genes participate in the regulation of biogenic amines that play critical roles in affect modulation and reward systems. The identification of genetic variations associated with mental disorders should provide an approach to evaluate risk for mental disorders, adjust pharmacotherapy on the individual level, and even allow for preventive interactions. New targets for the development of treatment are anticipated to derive from results of genetic studies. In this review, we summarize the current state of psychiatric genetics, underscore current discussions, and predict where the field is expected to move in the near future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-340
Number of pages9
JournalGenetics in Medicine
Volume9
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2007

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Mental Disorders
Psychiatry
Genes
Biogenic Amines
Human Genome
Neurosciences
Reward
Technology
Drug Therapy
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Association study
  • Complex disease
  • Linkage analysis
  • Psychiatric genetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

Zuchner, S. L., Roberts, S. T., Speer, M. C., & Beckham, J. C. (2007). Update on psychiatric genetics. Genetics in Medicine, 9(6), 332-340. https://doi.org/10.1097/GIM.0b013e318065a9fa

Update on psychiatric genetics. / Zuchner, Stephan L; Roberts, Sushma T.; Speer, Marcy C.; Beckham, Jean C.

In: Genetics in Medicine, Vol. 9, No. 6, 01.06.2007, p. 332-340.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zuchner, SL, Roberts, ST, Speer, MC & Beckham, JC 2007, 'Update on psychiatric genetics', Genetics in Medicine, vol. 9, no. 6, pp. 332-340. https://doi.org/10.1097/GIM.0b013e318065a9fa
Zuchner, Stephan L ; Roberts, Sushma T. ; Speer, Marcy C. ; Beckham, Jean C. / Update on psychiatric genetics. In: Genetics in Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 9, No. 6. pp. 332-340.
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