Understanding of evidence-based mental health care and the perceived importance of scientific information in a sample of U.S. adults

Vanesa A. Mora Ringle, Lucia M. Walsh, Colleen A. Maxwell, Ashley M. Smith, Rebecca A. Grossman, Sara J. Becker, Amanda Jensen-Doss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objectives: This online survey sought to qualitatively ascertain the extent to which a sample of U.S. adults understood the concept of evidence-based mental health care (EBMHC). Additional goals included assessing the perceived importance of scientific information in EBMHC, and examining whether understanding EBMHC and science values varied as a function of participant factors. Method: Participants (N = 221) defined EBMHC and rated the importance of scientific information. Open-ended EBMHC definitions were content-coded, and binomial logistic and linear regressions examined predictors of accurately defining EBMHC and of the perceived importance of scientific information. Results: Participants endorsed seven definitions of EBMHC, and only 20% defined it accurately. Having greater knowledge about mental health conditions was associated with understanding EBMHC and with the higher perceived importance of scientific information. Greater help-seeking efficacy also predicted higher perceived importance of scientific information. Conclusions: Results support customized strategies to promote basic EBMHC education among U.S. adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • direct-to-consumer marketing
  • dissemination
  • evidence-based mental health care
  • implementation
  • mental health literacy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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