Understanding barriers to evidence-based assessment: Clinician attitudes toward standardized assessment tools

Amanda Doss, Kristin M. Hawley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

93 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In an era of evidence-based practice, why are clinicians not typically engaged in evidence-based assessment? To begin to understand this issue, a national multidisciplinary survey was conducted to examine clinician attitudes toward standardized assessment tools. There were 1,442 child clinicians who provided opinions about the psychometric qualities of these tools, their benefit over clinical judgment alone, and their practicality. Doctoral-level clinicians and psychologists expressed more positive ratings in all three domains than master's-level clinicians and nonpsychologists, respectively, although only the disciplinary differences remained significant when predictors were examined simultaneously. All three attitude scales were predictive of standardized assessment tool use, although practical concerns were the strongest and only independent predictor of use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)885-896
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2010

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Evidence-Based Practice
Psychometrics
Psychology
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Understanding barriers to evidence-based assessment : Clinician attitudes toward standardized assessment tools. / Doss, Amanda; Hawley, Kristin M.

In: Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.11.2010, p. 885-896.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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