U-shaped association between prevalence of secondary hypogonadism and body mass index: a retrospective analysis of men with testosterone deficiency

Aaron A. Gurayah, Matthew M. Mason, John M. Masterson, Atil Y. Kargi, Ranjith Ramasamy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The prevalence of both obesity and hypogonadism in the United States has increased over the past two decades. While prior studies have shown an association between obesity and secondary hypogonadism—low testosterone and luteinizing hormone—few have used a large enough sample size to determine prevalence at each body mass index class. We aimed to compare rates of secondary hypogonadism among body mass index classes by constructing a retrospective database with men who had their body mass index, morning testosterone and luteinizing hormone levels measured during a visit to a urology clinic at a tertiary academic medical center between 2011–2020. Men previously on testosterone replacement therapy, Clomiphene, or Anastrozole were excluded. Chi-squared analysis was conducted in “R”. We found that among the 7211 men studied, 45.7%, 22.6%, and 4.4% were classified as having diagnosis of secondary, primary, and compensated hypogonadism, respectively. We found that obese men and underweight men had increased prevalence of secondary hypogonadism as compared to men with normal body mass index. These findings support the need for routine screening criteria and personalized advice to patients dealing with secondary hypogonadism.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalInternational Journal of Impotence Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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