Type A, amicability and injury: A prospective study of air traffic controllers

David J Lee, Steve J. Niemcryk, C. David Jenkins, Robert M. Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research has suggested that only a subset of Type A's may be at higher risk for negative health outcomes. The present prospective study of 416 air traffic controllers attempted to determine if a sub-group of Type A's who were disliked by their co-workers had significantly higher risk of injury than liked A's and all Type B's over a 27-month period. Liked B's were not different in terms of injury incidence from their not liked B counterparts (mean annualised rates of injury = 1.9 and 2.1 respectively); not liked Type A's had the highest rates of injuries of any group (8.5) including liked Type A's (3.8). Some psychological instruments were useful in discriminating the Type A not liked group from their liked counterparts and from the Type B's. These discriminating variables were used as covariates to determine if the relationship between being classified a not liked Type A and elevated injury incidence remained. Multiple regression analysis showed that distress from life events and being a not liked Type A remained significantly correlated with later injury (standardised coefficients 0.16 and 0.25 respectively).

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)177-186
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychosomatic Research
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Air
Prospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries
Incidence
Regression Analysis
Psychology
Health
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Type A, amicability and injury : A prospective study of air traffic controllers. / Lee, David J; Niemcryk, Steve J.; Jenkins, C. David; Rose, Robert M.

In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.01.1989, p. 177-186.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, David J ; Niemcryk, Steve J. ; Jenkins, C. David ; Rose, Robert M. / Type A, amicability and injury : A prospective study of air traffic controllers. In: Journal of Psychosomatic Research. 1989 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 177-186.
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