Turning the page

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Turning the Page is a famous book by Sung-sheng Yvonne Chang that tracks the changes in the political parameters guiding society, and bring profound changes in the literature of Taiwan. The book details the evolution of literary culture on Taiwan over the past half-century. Chang observes that the recycled policies and practices the Kuomintang (KMT) government established on the mainland during the Sino-Japanese war. Contrary to the widespread view that the military ruled with an iron fist, Chang argues that the military's leadership was pragmatic and essentially non-ideological. After lifting the emergency decrees, the government steadily withdrew from direct involvement in cultural activities. Chang believes that Taiwan began to be seen in different ways, as, a racially mixed community comprising Austronesian, Han Chinese, Portuguese, Dutch, and Japanese elements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalTaiwan Review
Volume55
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Taiwan
Military
Government
Emergency
Sino-Japanese War
Literary Culture
Decree
Sheng

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Turning the page. / Dreyer, June Teufel.

In: Taiwan Review, Vol. 55, No. 3, 03.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dreyer, JT 2005, 'Turning the page', Taiwan Review, vol. 55, no. 3.
Dreyer, June Teufel. / Turning the page. In: Taiwan Review. 2005 ; Vol. 55, No. 3.
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