Trends and mental health correlates of discrimination among Latin American and Asian immigrants in the United States

Christopher P. Salas-Wright, Michael G. Vaughn, Trenette Clark Goings, Sehun Oh, Jorge Delva, Mariana Cohen, Seth J. Schwartz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: To examine the national trends and mental health correlates of discrimination among Latin American and Asian immigrants in the United States. Methods: We examine data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions collected between 2004 and 2013. Recurrent discrimination was measured by respondent reports of adverse experiences such as receiving poor treatment in restaurants or being called a racist name. Results: Rates of perceived discrimination increased by more than 80 percent among immigrants from Latin America (from 14% in 2004 to 25% in 2013), but remained unchanged among Asian immigrants (20–22%). Large percentage point (pp) increases were observed among Latin American immigrants with less than a high school education (pp increase = 13.5) and residing in households earning $20-35,000 annually (pp increase = 14.0). Conclusions: Findings raise concern both because of the inherent iniquitousness of discrimination and because identity-based mistreatment is linked with mental health problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-486
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology
Volume55
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2020

Keywords

  • Asian
  • Discrimination
  • Immigrants
  • Latin American
  • Latino
  • Mental health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health(social science)
  • Social Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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