Treatment of depression in cancer patients is associated with better life adaptation: A pilot study

D. L. Evans, C. F. McCartney, J. J. Haggerty, C. B. Nemeroff, R. N. Golden, J. B. Simon, D. Quade, V. Holmes, M. Droba, G. A. Mason, W. C. Fowler, D. Raft

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

60 Scopus citations

Abstract

Major depression occurs in a significant number of cancer patients, and there is evidence that cancer patients with depression do not receive adequate antidepressant treatment. In an uncontrolled pilot study, the authors assess the degree of depression and the quality of life after the initiation of antidepressant medication treatment in 12 depressed cancer patients who received adequate antidepressant drugs and in 10 depressed cancer patients who received inadequate antidepressant treatment. These preliminary findings suggest that cancer patients with major depression benefit from antidepressant medication treatment and may experience an improved psychosocial adjustment to cancer. Controlled clinical trials will be necessary to verify these preliminary findings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-76
Number of pages5
JournalPsychosomatic medicine
Volume50
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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