Treatment of chronic wounds with bone marrow-derived cells

Evangelos V Badiavas, Vincent Falanga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

309 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Recent evidence indicates that bone marrow contains stem cells with the potential for differentiation into a variety of tissues, including endothelium, liver, muscle, bone, and skin. It may thus be plausible that bone marrow-derived cells can provide progenitor and/or stem cells to wounds during healing. Our objective in this study was to establish proof of principle that bone marrow-derived cells applied to chronic wounds can lead to closure of nonhealing wounds. We applied autologous bone marrow cells to chronic wounds in 3 patients with wounds of more than 1-year duration. These patients had not previously responded to standard and advanced therapies, including bioengineered skin application and grafting with autologous skin, Observations: Complete closure and evidence of dermal rebuilding was observed in all patients. Find ings suggesting engraftment of applied cells was observed in biopsy specimens of treated wounds. Clinical and histologic evidence of reduced scarring was also observed. Conclusion: Directly applied bone marrow-derived cell: can lead to dermal rebuilding and closure of nonhealing chronic wounds.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)510-516
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume139
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Bone Marrow Cells
Wounds and Injuries
Skin
Stem Cells
Therapeutics
Skin Transplantation
Wound Healing
Endothelium
Cicatrix
Bone Marrow
Biopsy
Bone and Bones
Muscles
Liver

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

Cite this

Treatment of chronic wounds with bone marrow-derived cells. / Badiavas, Evangelos V; Falanga, Vincent.

In: Archives of Dermatology, Vol. 139, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 510-516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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