Treating Tobacco Dependence Among African Americans

A Meta-Analytic Review

Monica W Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: African Americans suffer disproportionately from smoking-related morbidity and mortality; yet it is unclear whether existing treatments benefit this population. The purposes of this meta-analysis were to evaluate the overall efficacy of smoking cessation interventions (SCIs) among African American adults and to examine specific study characteristics and methods that influence treatment outcome. Design: Twenty published and unpublished studies representing 32 hypothesis tests and 12,743 smokers compared SCIs to control conditions. Main Outcome Measures: (1) Smoking abstinence post-treatment; (2) abstinence at the first follow-up assessment; and (3) 11 potential moderators of treatment effects. Results: Overall, SCIs increased the odds of cessation by 40% at posttest and 30% at follow-up. Treatment type, setting, cultural specificity, unit of analysis, outcome measure, nature of control group, and biochemical verification moderated the overall treatment effect size. Conclusion: SCIs are efficacious among African Americans. Theoretical, clinical, and future research implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
JournalHealth Psychology
Volume27
Issue number3 SUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

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Tobacco Use Disorder
African Americans
Smoking Cessation
Smoking
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Therapeutics
Meta-Analysis
Morbidity
Control Groups
Mortality
Population

Keywords

  • African American smokers
  • health disparities
  • smoking intervention
  • tobacco dependence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Treating Tobacco Dependence Among African Americans : A Meta-Analytic Review. / Hooper, Monica W.

In: Health Psychology, Vol. 27, No. 3 SUPPL., 01.05.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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