Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Symptoms Reported by Parents: Clinical, Imaging, and Host Predictors in Children with Impairments in Consciousness Less than 24 Hours

TRACK-TBI Investigators

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined the relationship between acute neuroimaging, host and injury factors, and parent-reported traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related symptoms in children with noncritical head injury at two weeks and three months after injury. Data were collected prospectively on 45 subjects aged three to 16 years old enrolled in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) study. Subjects had rapid recovery of mental status (Glasgow Coma Score [GCS] = 15 within 24 h), and had no clinical need for neurosurgical intervention. Intra- or extra-axial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) lesions were categorized using Common Data Elements (CDE) definitions. Host and acute injury factors including neurobehavioral history, race, extracranial injuries, loss of consciousness (LOC), and GCS were analyzed while controlling for pre-injury symptoms, age, sex, and socioeconomic status. Parent-reported cognitive and somatic symptoms were measured by the Health and Behavior Inventory (HBI). Forty-nine percent of children had MRI lesions, most of which were relatively small. LOC predicted increased cognitive and somatic symptoms at two weeks. At three months, pre-injury neurobehavioral history predicted increased cognitive and somatic symptoms. Neuroimaging findings did not predict parent-reported symptom severity, except at three months where extra-axial lesions were associated with less severe cognitive symptoms. While structural MRI lesions do not predict increased parent-reported symptoms in this population, age-specific child performance measures may be more sensitive outcome measures and require further study. Children with pre-injury neurobehavioral problems have more severe symptoms at three months and thus may benefit from longer follow-up and monitoring after traumatic brain injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2287-2297
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of neurotrauma
Volume35
Issue number19
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • cognitive function
  • MRI
  • pediatric brain injury
  • traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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