Traumatic brain injury induced cell proliferation in the adult mammalian central nervous system

S. Chirumamilla, D. Sun, Ross Bullock, R. J. Colello

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

224 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent studies indicate the existence of progenitor cells and their potential for neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the hippocampus of the normal adult mammalian brain. However, the proliferative response and the specific cell types generated following traumatic brain injury have not been examined. This cellular response to CNS injury was investigated using the fluid percussion injury (FPI) model, a widely accepted rat model that simulates moderate head injury sustained in humans. Fortyeight hours following moderate FPI, adult rats received intraperitoneal injections of the thymidine analogs, 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) or tritiated thymidine (3H-thymidine), which are markers for mitotic activity. Injured and control animals receiving BrdU were used to determine the total number of cells induced to proliferate. To determine the cellular identity of these proliferating cells, animals receiving 3H-thymidine were sacrificed and sections through the injured area were immunostained with markers for immature and mature astrocytes, activated microglia, neural precursors and mature neurons. These studies showed that the total number of proliferating cells was significantly increased in the injury group for both the SVZ and the hippocampus. However, the proliferating cells in the SVZ did not express any of the cellular markers used, suggesting that they have not yet begun to differentiate. In contrast, there was a significant increase in the number of immature astrocytes and activated microglia, but not neurons, at this early time point in the hippocampus. Taken together, these experiments demonstrate the compensatory capacity of the adult brain to injury and should lead to a new generation of studies aimed at enhancing the neuronal proliferative response.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)693-703
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume19
Issue number6
StatePublished - Jul 23 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Thymidine
Lateral Ventricles
Central Nervous System
Cell Proliferation
Percussion
Hippocampus
Wounds and Injuries
Microglia
Bromodeoxyuridine
Astrocytes
Cell Count
Neurons
Neurogenesis
Intraperitoneal Injections
Craniocerebral Trauma
Brain Injuries
Stem Cells
Traumatic Brain Injury
Brain

Keywords

  • Bromodeoxyuridine
  • Fluid percussion injury
  • Hippocampus
  • Progenitor cells
  • Subventricular zone
  • Thymidine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Chirumamilla, S., Sun, D., Bullock, R., & Colello, R. J. (2002). Traumatic brain injury induced cell proliferation in the adult mammalian central nervous system. Journal of Neurotrauma, 19(6), 693-703.

Traumatic brain injury induced cell proliferation in the adult mammalian central nervous system. / Chirumamilla, S.; Sun, D.; Bullock, Ross; Colello, R. J.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 19, No. 6, 23.07.2002, p. 693-703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chirumamilla, S, Sun, D, Bullock, R & Colello, RJ 2002, 'Traumatic brain injury induced cell proliferation in the adult mammalian central nervous system', Journal of Neurotrauma, vol. 19, no. 6, pp. 693-703.
Chirumamilla, S. ; Sun, D. ; Bullock, Ross ; Colello, R. J. / Traumatic brain injury induced cell proliferation in the adult mammalian central nervous system. In: Journal of Neurotrauma. 2002 ; Vol. 19, No. 6. pp. 693-703.
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