Trauma signature analysis of the great East Japan disaster: guidance for psychological consequences

James M. Shultz, David Forbes, David Wald, Fiona Kelly, Helena M Solo-Gabriele, Alexa Rosen, Zelde Espinel, Andrew McLean, Oscar Bernal, Yuval Neria

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: On March 11, 2011, Japan experienced the largest earthquake in its history. The undersea earthquake launched a tsunami that inundated much of Japan's eastern coastline and damaged nuclear power plants, precipitating multiple reactor meltdowns. We examined open-source disaster situation reports, news accounts, and disaster-monitoring websites to gather event-specific data to conduct a trauma signature analysis of the event.

METHODS: The trauma signature analysis included a review of disaster situation reports; the construction of a hazard profile for the earthquake, tsunami, and radiation threats; enumeration of disaster stressors by disaster phase; identification of salient evidence-based psychological risk factors; summation of the trauma signature based on exposure to hazards, loss, and change; and review of the mental health and psychosocial support responses in relation to the analysis.

RESULTS: Exposure to this triple-hazard event resulted in extensive damage, significant loss of life, and massive population displacement. Many citizens were exposed to multiple hazards. The extremity of these exposures was partially mitigated by Japan's timely, expert-coordinated, and unified activation of an evidence-based mental health response.

CONCLUSIONS: The eastern Japan disaster was notable for its unique constellation of compounding exposures. Examination of the trauma signature of this event provided insights and guidance regarding optimal mental health and psychosocial responses. Japan orchestrated a model response that reinforced community resilience.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)201-214
Number of pages14
JournalDisaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Volume7
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2013

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Disasters
Japan
Psychology
Earthquakes
Wounds and Injuries
Tsunamis
Mental Health
Nuclear Power Plants
Extremities
History
Radiation
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Trauma signature analysis of the great East Japan disaster : guidance for psychological consequences. / Shultz, James M.; Forbes, David; Wald, David; Kelly, Fiona; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M; Rosen, Alexa; Espinel, Zelde; McLean, Andrew; Bernal, Oscar; Neria, Yuval.

In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, Vol. 7, No. 2, 01.04.2013, p. 201-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shultz, JM, Forbes, D, Wald, D, Kelly, F, Solo-Gabriele, HM, Rosen, A, Espinel, Z, McLean, A, Bernal, O & Neria, Y 2013, 'Trauma signature analysis of the great East Japan disaster: guidance for psychological consequences', Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness, vol. 7, no. 2, pp. 201-214. https://doi.org/10.1017/dmp.2013.21
Shultz, James M. ; Forbes, David ; Wald, David ; Kelly, Fiona ; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M ; Rosen, Alexa ; Espinel, Zelde ; McLean, Andrew ; Bernal, Oscar ; Neria, Yuval. / Trauma signature analysis of the great East Japan disaster : guidance for psychological consequences. In: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness. 2013 ; Vol. 7, No. 2. pp. 201-214.
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