Transport properties of cartilaginous tissues

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cartilaginous tissues, such as articular cartilage and intervertebral disc, are avascular tissues, which rely on transport for cellular nutrition. Comprehensive knowledge of transport properties in such tissues is therefore necessary in the understanding of nutritional supply to cells. Furthermore, poor cellular nutrition in cartilaginous tissues is believed to be a primary source of tissue degeneration, which may result in osteoarthritis (OA) or disc degeneration. In this mini-review, we present an overview of the current status of the study of transport properties and behavior in cartilaginous tissues. The mechanisms of transport in these tissues, as well as experimental approaches to measuring transport properties and results obtained are discussed. The current status of bioreactors used in cartilage tissue engineering is also presented.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)40-50
Number of pages11
JournalCurrent Rheumatology Reviews
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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Intervertebral Disc Degeneration
Intervertebral Disc
Articular Cartilage
Bioreactors
Tissue Engineering
Osteoarthritis
Cartilage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Transport properties of cartilaginous tissues. / Jackson, Alicia Renee; Gu, Weiyong.

In: Current Rheumatology Reviews, Vol. 5, No. 1, 01.06.2009, p. 40-50.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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