Translocation of YopE and YopN into eukaryotic cells by Yersinia pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN, yscB and lcrG deletion mutants measured using a phosphorylatable peptide tag and phosphospecific antibodies

James B. Day, Franco Ferracci, Gregory V Plano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, exports a set of virulence proteins called Yops upon contact with eukaryotic cells. A subset of these Yops is translocated directly into the cytosol of host cells. In this study, a novel protein tag-based reporter system is used to measure the translocation of Yops into cultured eukaryotic cells. The reporter system uses a small bipartite phosphorylatable peptide tag, termed the Elk tag. Translocation of an Elk-tagged protein into eukaryotic cells results in host cell protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the tag at a specific serine residue, which can subsequently be detected with phosphospecific antibodies. The YopN, TyeA, SycN, YscB and LcrG proteins function to prevent Yop secretion before host cell contact. The role of these proteins was investigated in the translocation of Elk-tagged YopE (YopE129-Elk) and YopN (YopN293-Elk) into HeLa cells. Y. pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN and yscB deletion mutants showed reduced levels of YopE129-Elk phosphorylation compared with the parent strain, indicating that these mutants translocate reduced amounts of YopE. We also demonstrate that YopN293-Elk is translocated into HeLa cells and that this process is more efficient in a Yersinia yop polymutant strain lacking the six translocated effector Yops. Y. pestis sycN and yscB mutants translocated reduced amounts of YopN293-Elk; however, tyeA and lcrG mutants translocated higher amounts of YopN293-Elk compared with the parent strain. These data suggest that TyeA and LcrG function to suppress the secretion of YopN before host cell contact, whereas SycN and YscB facilitate YopN secretion and subsequent translocation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)807-823
Number of pages17
JournalMolecular Microbiology
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 29 2003

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Phospho-Specific Antibodies
Yersinia pestis
Eukaryotic Cells
Peptides
Proteins
HeLa Cells
Phosphorylation
Yersinia
Plague
Cytosol
Protein Kinases
Serine
Virulence
Cultured Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Microbiology

Cite this

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title = "Translocation of YopE and YopN into eukaryotic cells by Yersinia pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN, yscB and lcrG deletion mutants measured using a phosphorylatable peptide tag and phosphospecific antibodies",
abstract = "Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, exports a set of virulence proteins called Yops upon contact with eukaryotic cells. A subset of these Yops is translocated directly into the cytosol of host cells. In this study, a novel protein tag-based reporter system is used to measure the translocation of Yops into cultured eukaryotic cells. The reporter system uses a small bipartite phosphorylatable peptide tag, termed the Elk tag. Translocation of an Elk-tagged protein into eukaryotic cells results in host cell protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the tag at a specific serine residue, which can subsequently be detected with phosphospecific antibodies. The YopN, TyeA, SycN, YscB and LcrG proteins function to prevent Yop secretion before host cell contact. The role of these proteins was investigated in the translocation of Elk-tagged YopE (YopE129-Elk) and YopN (YopN293-Elk) into HeLa cells. Y. pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN and yscB deletion mutants showed reduced levels of YopE129-Elk phosphorylation compared with the parent strain, indicating that these mutants translocate reduced amounts of YopE. We also demonstrate that YopN293-Elk is translocated into HeLa cells and that this process is more efficient in a Yersinia yop polymutant strain lacking the six translocated effector Yops. Y. pestis sycN and yscB mutants translocated reduced amounts of YopN293-Elk; however, tyeA and lcrG mutants translocated higher amounts of YopN293-Elk compared with the parent strain. These data suggest that TyeA and LcrG function to suppress the secretion of YopN before host cell contact, whereas SycN and YscB facilitate YopN secretion and subsequent translocation.",
author = "Day, {James B.} and Franco Ferracci and Plano, {Gregory V}",
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T1 - Translocation of YopE and YopN into eukaryotic cells by Yersinia pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN, yscB and lcrG deletion mutants measured using a phosphorylatable peptide tag and phosphospecific antibodies

AU - Day, James B.

AU - Ferracci, Franco

AU - Plano, Gregory V

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N2 - Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, exports a set of virulence proteins called Yops upon contact with eukaryotic cells. A subset of these Yops is translocated directly into the cytosol of host cells. In this study, a novel protein tag-based reporter system is used to measure the translocation of Yops into cultured eukaryotic cells. The reporter system uses a small bipartite phosphorylatable peptide tag, termed the Elk tag. Translocation of an Elk-tagged protein into eukaryotic cells results in host cell protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the tag at a specific serine residue, which can subsequently be detected with phosphospecific antibodies. The YopN, TyeA, SycN, YscB and LcrG proteins function to prevent Yop secretion before host cell contact. The role of these proteins was investigated in the translocation of Elk-tagged YopE (YopE129-Elk) and YopN (YopN293-Elk) into HeLa cells. Y. pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN and yscB deletion mutants showed reduced levels of YopE129-Elk phosphorylation compared with the parent strain, indicating that these mutants translocate reduced amounts of YopE. We also demonstrate that YopN293-Elk is translocated into HeLa cells and that this process is more efficient in a Yersinia yop polymutant strain lacking the six translocated effector Yops. Y. pestis sycN and yscB mutants translocated reduced amounts of YopN293-Elk; however, tyeA and lcrG mutants translocated higher amounts of YopN293-Elk compared with the parent strain. These data suggest that TyeA and LcrG function to suppress the secretion of YopN before host cell contact, whereas SycN and YscB facilitate YopN secretion and subsequent translocation.

AB - Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague, exports a set of virulence proteins called Yops upon contact with eukaryotic cells. A subset of these Yops is translocated directly into the cytosol of host cells. In this study, a novel protein tag-based reporter system is used to measure the translocation of Yops into cultured eukaryotic cells. The reporter system uses a small bipartite phosphorylatable peptide tag, termed the Elk tag. Translocation of an Elk-tagged protein into eukaryotic cells results in host cell protein kinase-dependent phosphorylation of the tag at a specific serine residue, which can subsequently be detected with phosphospecific antibodies. The YopN, TyeA, SycN, YscB and LcrG proteins function to prevent Yop secretion before host cell contact. The role of these proteins was investigated in the translocation of Elk-tagged YopE (YopE129-Elk) and YopN (YopN293-Elk) into HeLa cells. Y. pestis yopN, tyeA, sycN and yscB deletion mutants showed reduced levels of YopE129-Elk phosphorylation compared with the parent strain, indicating that these mutants translocate reduced amounts of YopE. We also demonstrate that YopN293-Elk is translocated into HeLa cells and that this process is more efficient in a Yersinia yop polymutant strain lacking the six translocated effector Yops. Y. pestis sycN and yscB mutants translocated reduced amounts of YopN293-Elk; however, tyeA and lcrG mutants translocated higher amounts of YopN293-Elk compared with the parent strain. These data suggest that TyeA and LcrG function to suppress the secretion of YopN before host cell contact, whereas SycN and YscB facilitate YopN secretion and subsequent translocation.

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